RFC Abstracts

RFC0967 - All victims together
This RFC proposes a new set of RFCs on how the networking code is integrated with various operating systems. It appears that this topic has not received enough exposure in the literature. Comments and suggestions are encouraged.
RFC0966 - Host groups: A multicast extension to the Internet Protocol
This RFC defines a model of service for Internet multicasting and proposes an extension to the Internet Protocol (IP) to support such a multicast service. Discussion and suggestions for improvements are requested. See RFC-988.
RFC0965 - Format for a graphical communication protocol
This RFC describes the requirements for a graphical format on which to base a graphical on-line communication protocol, and proposes an Interactive Graphical Communication Format using the GKSM session metafile. We hope this contribution will encourage the discussion of multimedia data exchange and the proposal of solutions.
RFC0964 - Some problems with the specification of the Military Standard Transmission Control Protocol
The purpose of this RFC is to provide helpful information on the Military Standard Transmission Control Protocol (MIL-STD-1778) so that one can obtain a reliable implementation of this protocol standard. This note points out three errors with this specification. This note also proposes solutions to these problems.
RFC0963 - Some problems with the specification of the Military Standard Internet Protocol
The purpose of this RFC is to provide helpful information on the Military Standard Internet Protocol (MIL-STD-1777) so that one can obtain a reliable implementation of this protocol. This paper points out several problems in this specification. This note also proposes solutions to these problems.
RFC0962 - TCP-4 prime
This memo is in response to Bob Braden's call for a transaction oriented protocol (RFC-955), and continues the discussion of a possible transaction oriented transport protocol. This memo does not propose a standard.
RFC0961 - Official ARPA-Internet protocols
This memo identifies the documents specifying the official protocols used in the Internet, and comments on any revisions or changes planned. This edition of the Official Protocols updates and obsoletes RFC-944. This memo is an official status report on the protocols used in the ARPA-Internet community. See RFC-991.
RFC0960 - Assigned numbers
This memo documents the currently assigned values from several series of numbers used in network protocol implementations. This edition of Assigned Numbers updates and obsoletes RFC-943. This memo is an official status report on the numbers used in protocols in the ARPA-Internet community. See RFC-990 and 997.
RFC0959 - File Transfer Protocol
This memo is the official specification of the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) for the DARPA Internet community. The primary intent is to clarify and correct the documentation of the FTP specification, not to change the protocol. The following new optional commands are included in this edition of the specification: Change to Parent Directory (CDUP), Structure Mount (SMNT), Store Unique (STOU), Remove Directory (RMD), Make Directory (MKD), Print Directory (PWD), and System (SYST). Note that this specification is compatible with the previous edition.
RFC0958 - Network Time Protocol (NTP)
This document describes the Network Time Protocol (NTP), a protocol for synchronizing a set of network clocks using a set of distributed clients and servers. NTP is built on the User Datagram Protocol (UDP), which provides a connectionless transport mechanism. It is evolved from the Time Protocol and the ICMP Timestamp message and is a suitable replacement for both. This RFC suggests a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC0957 - Experiments in network clock synchronization
This RFC discusses some experiments in clock synchronization in the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements. One of the services frequently neglected in computer network design is a high-quality, time-of-day clock capable of generating accurate timestamps with small errors compared to one-way network delays. Such a service would be useful for tracing the progress of complex transactions, synchronizing cached data bases, monitoring network performance and isolating problems. In this memo one such clock service design will be described and its performance assessed. This design has been incorporated as an integral part of the network routing and control protocols of the Distributed Computer Network (DCnet) architecture.
RFC0956 - Algorithms for synchronizing network clocks
This RFC discussed clock synchronization algorithms for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements. The recent interest within the Internet community in determining accurate time from a set of mutually suspicious network clocks has been prompted by several occasions in which errors were found in usually reliable, accurate clock servers after thunderstorms which disrupted their power supply. To these sources of error should be added those due to malfunctioning hardware, defective software and operator mistakes, as well as random errors in the mechanism used to set and synchronize clocks. This report suggests a stochastic model and algorithms for computing a good estimator from time-offset samples measured between clocks connected via network links. Included in this report are descriptions of certain experiments which give an indication of the effectiveness of the algorithms.
RFC0955 - Towards a transport service for transaction processing applications
The DoD Internet protocol suite includes two alternative transport service protocols, TCP and UDP, which provide virtual circuit and datagram service, respectively. These two protocols represent points in the space of possible transport service attributes which are quite "far apart". We want to examine an important class of applications, those which perform what is often called "transaction processing". We will see that the communication needs for these applications fall into the gap "between" TCP and UDP -- neither protocol is very appropriate. This RFC is concerned with the possible design of one or more new protocols for the ARPA-Internet, to support kinds of applications which are not well supported at present. The RFC is intended to spur discussion in the Internet research community towards the development of new protocols and/or concepts, in order to meet these unmet application requirements. It does not represent a standard, nor even a concrete protocol proposal.
RFC0954 - NICNAME/WHOIS
This RFC is the official specification of the NICNAME/WHOIS protocol. This memo describes the protocol and the service. This is an update of RFC-812.
RFC0953 - Hostname Server
This RFC is the official specification of the Hostname Server Protocol. This edition of the specification includes minor revisions to RFC-811 which brings it up to date.
RFC0952 - DoD Internet host table specification
This RFC is the official specification of the format of the Internet Host Table. This edition of the specification includes minor revisions to RFC-810 which brings it up to date.
RFC0951 - Bootstrap Protocol
This RFC describes an IP/UDP bootstrap protocol (BOOTP) which allows a diskless client machine to discover its own IP address, the address of a server host, and the name of a file to be loaded into memory and executed. The bootstrap operation can be thought of as consisting of TWO PHASES. This RFC describes the first phase, which could be labeled `address determination and bootfile selection'. After this address and filename information is obtained, control passes to the second phase of the bootstrap where a file transfer occurs. The file transfer will typically use the TFTP protocol, since it is intended that both phases reside in PROM on the client. However BOOTP could also work with other protocols such as SFTP or FTP. This RFC suggests a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC0950 - Internet Standard Subnetting Procedure
This memo discusses the utility of "subnets" of Internet networks, which are logically visible sub-sections of a single Internet network. For administrative or technical reasons, many organizations have chosen to divide one Internet network into several subnets, instead of acquiring a set of Internet network numbers. This memo specifies procedures for the use of subnets. These procedures are for hosts (e.g., workstations). The procedures used in and between subnet gateways are not fully described. Important motivation and background information for a subnetting standard is provided in RFC-940. This RFC specifies a protocol for the ARPA-Internet community. If subnetting is implemented it is strongly recommended that these procedures be followed.
RFC0949 - FTP unique-named store command
There are various contexts in which it would be desirable to have an FTP command that had the effect of the present STOR but rather than requiring the sender to specify a file name istead caused the resultant file to have a unique name relative to the current directory. This RFC proposes an extension to the File Transfer Protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements. See RFC-959.
RFC0948 - Two methods for the transmission of IP datagrams over IEEE 802.3 networks
This RFC describes two methods of encapsulating Internet Protocol (IP) datagrams on an IEEE 802.3 network. This RFC suggests a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC0947 - Multi-network broadcasting within the Internet
This RFC describes the extension of a network's broadcast domain to include more than one physical network through the use of a broadcast packet repeater.
RFC0946 - Telnet terminal location number option
Many systems provide a mechanism for finding out where a user is logged in from usually including information about telephone extension and office occupants names. The information is useful for physically locating people and/or calling them on the phone. In 1982 CMU designed and implemented a terminal location database and modified existing network software to handle a 64-bit number called the Terminal Location Number (or TTYLOC). It now seems appropriate to incorporate this mechanism into the TCP-based network protocol family. The mechanism is not viewed as a replacement for the Terminal Location Telnet Option (SEND-LOCATION) but as a shorthand mechansim for communicating terminal location information between hosts in a localized community. This RFC proposes a new option for Telnet for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC0945 - DoD statement on the NRC report
In May 1983 the National Research Council (NRC) was asked jointly by DoD and NBS to study the issues and recommend a course of action. The final report of the NRC committee was published in February 1985 (see RFC-942). The enclosed letter is from Donald C. Latham (ASDC3I) to DCA transmitting the NRC report and requesting specific actions relative to the recommendations of the report. This RFC reproduces a letter from the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (ASDC3I) to the Director of the Defense Communications Agency (DCA). This letter is distributed for information only.
RFC0944 - Official ARPA-Internet protocols
This RFC identifies the documents specifying the official protocols used in the Internet. This edition of Official ARPA-Internet Protocols obsoletes RFC-924 and earlier editions. This RFC will be updated periodically, and current information can be obtained from Joyce Reynolds. This memo is an official status report on the protocols used in the ARPA-Internet community. See RFC-991.
RFC0943 - Assigned numbers
This Network Working Group Request for Comments documents the currently assigned values from several series of numbers used in network protocol implementations. This RFC will be updated periodically, and in any case current information can be obtained from Joyce Reynolds. The assignment of numbers is also handled by Joyce. If you are developing a protocol or application that will require the use of a link, socket, port, protocol, network number, etc., please contact Joyce to receive a number assignment. This memo is an official status report on the numbers used in protocols in the ARPA-Internet community. See RFC-990 and 997.
RFC0942 - Transport protocols for Department of Defense data networks
This RFC reproduces the National Research Council report resulting from a study of the DoD Internet Protocol (IP) and Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) in comparison with the ISO Internet Protocol (ISO-IP) and Transport Protocol level 4 (TP-4).
RFC0941 - Addendum to the network service definition covering network layer addressing
This Addendum to the Network Service Definition Standard, ISO 8348, defines the abstract syntax and semantics of the Network Address (Network Service Access Point Address). The Network Address defined in this Addendum is the address that appears in the primitives of the connection-mode Network Service as the calling address, called address, and responding address parameters, and in the primitives of the connectionless-mode Network Service as the source address and destination address parameters. This document is distributed as an RFC for information only. It does not specify a standard for the ARPA-Internet.
RFC0940 - Toward an Internet standard scheme for subnetting
Several sites now contain a complex of local links connected to the Internet via a gateway. The details of the internal connectivity are of little interest to the rest of the Internet. One way of organizing these local complexes of links is to use the same strategy as the Internet uses to organize networks, that is, to declare each link to be an entity (like a network) and to interconnect the links with devices that perform routing functions (like gateways). This general scheme is called subnetting, the individual links are called subnets, and the connecting devices are called subgateways (or bridges, or gateways). This RFC discusses standardizing the protocol used in subnetted environments in the ARPA-Internet.
RFC0939 - Executive summary of the NRC report on transport protocols for Department of Defense data networks
This RFC reproduces the material from the "front pages" of the National Research Council report resulting from a study of the DOD Internet Protocol (IP) and Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) in comparison with the ISO Internet Protocol (ISO-IP) and Transport Protocol level 4 (TP-4). The point of this RFC is to make the text of the Executive Summary widely available in a timely way. The order of presentation has been altered, and the pagination changed. This RFC is distributed for information only. This RFC does not establish any policy for the DARPA research community or the DDN operational community.
RFC0938 - Internet Reliable Transaction Protocol functional and interface specification
This RFC is being distributed to members of the DARPA research community in order to solicit their reactions to the proposals contained in it. While the issues discussed may not be directly relevant to the research problems of the DARPA community, they may be interesting to a number of researchers and implementors. This RFC suggests a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC0937 - Post Office Protocol: Version 2
This RFC suggests a simple method for workstations to dynamically access mail from a mailbox server. This RFC specifies a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvement. This memo is a revision of RFC-918.
RFC0936 - Another Internet subnet addressing scheme
There have been several proposals for schemes to allow the use of a single Internet network number to refer to a collection of physical networks under common administration which are reachable from the rest of the Internet by a common route. Such schemes allow a simplified view of an otherwise complicated topology from hosts and gateways outside of this collection. They allow the complexity of the number and type of these networks, and routing to them, to be localized. Additions and changes in configuration thus cause no detectable change, and no interruption of service, due to slow propagation of routing and other information outside of the local environment. These schemes also simplify the administration of the network, as changes do not require allocation of new network numbers for each new cable installed. This proposal discusses an alternative scheme, one that has been in use at the University of California, Berkeley since April 1984. This RFC suggests a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC0935 - Reliable link layer protocols
This RFC discusses protocols proposed recently in RFCs 914 and 916, and suggests a proposed protocol that could meet the same needs addressed in those memos. The stated need is reliable communication between two programs over a full-duplex, point-to-point communication link, and in particular the RFCs address the need for such communication over an asynchronous link at relatively low speeds. The suggested protocol uses the methods of existing national and international data link layer standards. This RFC suggests a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC0934 - Proposed standard for message encapsulation
This memo concerns itself with message forwarding. Forwarding can be thought of as encapsulating one or more messages inside another. Although this is useful for transfer of past correspondence to new recipients, without a decapsulation process (which this memo terms "bursting"), the forwarded messages are of little use to the recipients because they can not be distributed, forwarded, replied-to, or otherwise processed as separate individual messages. In order to burst a message it is necessary to know how the component messages were encapsulated in the draft. At present there is no unambiguous standard for interest group digests. This RFC proposes a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC0933 - Output marking Telnet option
This proposed option would allow a Server-Telnet to send a banner to a User-Telnet so that this banner would be displayed on the workstation screen independently of the application software running in the Server-Telnet.
RFC0932 - Subnetwork addressing scheme
This RFC proposes an alternative addressing scheme for subnets which, in most cases, requires no modification to host software whatsoever. The drawbacks of this scheme are that the total number of subnets in any one network are limited, and that modification is required to all gateways.
RFC0931 - Authentication server
This RFC suggests a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements. This is the second draft of this proposal (superseding RFC-912) and incorporates a more formal description of the syntax for the request and response dialog, as well as a change to specify the type of user identification returned.
RFC0930 - Telnet terminal type option
This RFC specifies a standard for the ARPA Internet community. Hosts on the ARPA Internet that exchange terminal type information within the Telnet protocol are expected to adopt and implement this standard. This standard supersedes RFC-884. The only change is to specify that the TERMINAL-TYPE IS sub-negotiation should be sent only in response to the TERMINAL-TYPE SEND sub-negotiation.
RFC0929 - Proposed Host-Front End Protocol
The Host-Front End Protocol introduced in RFC-928 is described in detail in this memo. The first order of business is to declare that THIS IS A PROPOSAL, NOT A FINAL STANDARD, and the second order of business is to request that any readers of these documents who are able to do test implementations (a) do so and (b) coordinate their efforts with the author. This RFC suggests a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC0928 - Introduction to proposed DoD standard H-FP
The broad outline of the Host-Front End Protocol introduced here and described in RFC-929 is the result of the deliberations of a number of experienced H-FP designers, who sat as a committee of the DoD Protocol Standards Technical Panel. It is the intent of the designers that the protocol be subjected to multiple test implementations and probable iteration before being agreed upon as any sort of "standard". Therefore, the first order of business is to declare that THIS IS A PROPOSAL, NOT A FINAL STANDARD, and the second order of business is to request that any readers of these documents who are able to do test implementations (a) do so and (b) coordinate their efforts with the author. This RFC suggests a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC0927 - TACACS user identification Telnet option
The following is the description of a TELNET option designed to facilitate double login avoidance. It is intended primarily for TAC connections to target hosts on behalf of TAC users, but it can be used between any two consenting hosts. For example, all hosts at one site (e.g., BBN) can use this option to avoid double login when TELNETing to one another. This RFC suggests a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC0926 - Protocol for providing the connectionless mode network services
This note is the draft ISO protocol roughly similar to the DOD Internet Protocol. This document has been prepared by retyping the text of ISO DIS 8473 of May 1984, which is currently undergoing voting within ISO as a Draft International Standard (DIS). This document is distributred as an RFC for information only. It does not specify a standard for the ARPA-Internet.
RFC0925 - Multi-LAN address resolution
The problem of treating a set of local area networks (LANs) as one Internet network has generated some interest and concern. It is inappropriate to give each LAN within an site a distinct Internet network number. It is desirable to hide the details of the interconnections between the LANs within an site from people, gateways, and hosts outside the site. The question arises on how to best do this, and even how to do it at all. In RFC-917 Jeffery Mogul makes a case for the use of "explicit subnets" in a multi-LAN environment. The explicit subnet scheme is a call to recursively apply the mechanisms the Internet uses to manage networks to the problem of managing LANs within one network. In this note I urge another approach: the use of "transparent subnets" supported by a multi-LAN extension of the Address Resolution Protocol. This RFC suggests a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC0924 - Official ARPA-Internet protocols for connecting personal computers to the Internet
This RFC identifies the documents specifying the official protocols used in the Internet. This edition of Official ARPA-Internet Protocols obsoletes RFC-900 and earlier editions. This memo is an official status report on the protocols used in the ARPA-Internet community. See RFC-991.
RFC0923 - Assigned numbers
This RFC documents the currently assigned values from several series of numbers used in network protocol implementations. This edition of Assigned Numbers obsoletes RFC-900 and earlier editions. This memo is an official status report on the numbers used in protocols in the ARPA-Internet community. See RFC-990, and 997.
RFC0922 - Broadcasting Internet datagrams in the presence of subnets
We propose simple rules for broadcasting Internet datagrams on local networks that support broadcast, for addressing broadcasts, and for how gateways should handle them. This RFC suggests a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC0921 - Domain name system implementation schedule - revised
This memo is a policy statement on the implementation of the Domain Style Naming System in the Internet. This memo is an update of RFC-881, and RFC-897. This is an official policy statement of the IAB and the DARPA. The intent of this memo is to detail the schedule for the implementation for the Domain Style Naming System. The explanation of how this system works is to be found in the references.
RFC0920 - Domain requirements
This memo states the requirements on establishing a Domain, and introduces the limited set of top level domains. This memo is a policy statement on the requirements of establishing a new domain in the ARPA-Internet and the DARPA research community. This is an official policy statement of the IAB and the DARPA.
RFC0919 - Broadcasting Internet Datagrams
This RFC proposes simple rules for broadcasting Internet datagrams on local networks that support broadcast, for addressing broadcasts, and for how gateways should handle them. This RFC suggests a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC0918 - Post Office Protocol
This RFC suggests a simple method for workstations to dynamically access mail from a mailbox server. The intent of the Post Office Protocol (POP) is to allow a user's workstation to access mail from a mailbox server. It is expected that mail will be posted from the workstation to the mailbox server via the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP). This RFC specifies a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvement. The status of this protocol is experimental, and this protocol is dependent upon TCP.