RFC Abstracts

RFC8262 - Content-ID Header Field in the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)
This document specifies the Content-ID header field for usage in the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP). This document also updates RFC 5621, which only allows a Content-ID URL to reference a body part that is part of a multipart message-body. This update enables a Content-ID URL to reference a complete message-body and metadata provided by some additional SIP header fields.
RFC8261 - Datagram Transport Layer Security (DTLS) Encapsulation of SCTP Packets
The Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) is a transport protocol originally defined to run on top of the network protocols IPv4 or IPv6. This document specifies how SCTP can be used on top of the Datagram Transport Layer Security (DTLS) protocol. Using the encapsulation method described in this document, SCTP is unaware of the protocols being used below DTLS; hence, explicit IP addresses cannot be used in the SCTP control chunks. As a consequence, the SCTP associations carried over DTLS can only be single-homed.
RFC8260 - Stream Schedulers and User Message Interleaving for the Stream Control Transmission Protocol
The Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) is a message-oriented transport protocol supporting arbitrarily large user messages. This document adds a new chunk to SCTP for carrying payload data. This allows a sender to interleave different user messages that would otherwise result in head-of-line blocking at the sender. The interleaving of user messages is required for WebRTC data channels.
RFC8259 - The JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) Data Interchange Format
JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) is a lightweight, text-based, language-independent data interchange format. It was derived from the ECMAScript Programming Language Standard. JSON defines a small set of formatting rules for the portable representation of structured data.
RFC8258 - Generalized SCSI: A Generic Structure for Interface Switching Capability Descriptor (ISCD) Switching Capability Specific Information (SCSI)
This document defines a generic information structure for information carried in routing protocol Interface Switching Capability Descriptor (ISCD) Switching Capability Specific Information (SCSI) fields. This "Generalized SCSI" can be used with routing protocols that define GMPLS ISCDs and any specific technology. This document does not modify any existing technology-specific formats and is defined for use in conjunction with new GMPLS Switching Capability types. The context for this document is Generalized MPLS, and the reader is expected to be familiar with the GMPLS architecture and associated protocol standards.
RFC8257 - Data Center TCP (DCTCP): TCP Congestion Control for Data Centers
This Informational RFC describes Data Center TCP (DCTCP): a TCP congestion control scheme for data-center traffic. DCTCP extends the Explicit Congestion Notification (ECN) processing to estimate the fraction of bytes that encounter congestion rather than simply detecting that some congestion has occurred. DCTCP then scales the TCP congestion window based on this estimate. This method achieves high-burst tolerance, low latency, and high throughput with shallow- buffered switches. This memo also discusses deployment issues related to the coexistence of DCTCP and conventional TCP, discusses the lack of a negotiating mechanism between sender and receiver, and presents some possible mitigations. This memo documents DCTCP as currently implemented by several major operating systems. DCTCP, as described in this specification, is applicable to deployments in controlled environments like data centers, but it must not be deployed over the public Internet without additional measures.
RFC8256 - Requirements for Hitless MPLS Path Segment Monitoring
One of the most important Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) capabilities for transport-network operation is fault localization. An in-service, on-demand path segment monitoring function of a transport path is indispensable, particularly when the service monitoring function is activated only between endpoints. However, the current segment monitoring approach defined for MPLS (including the MPLS Transport Profile (MPLS-TP)) in RFC 6371 "Operations, Administration, and Maintenance Framework for MPLS-Based Transport Networks" has drawbacks. This document provides an analysis of the existing MPLS-TP OAM mechanisms for the path segment monitoring and provides requirements to guide the development of new OAM tools to support Hitless Path Segment Monitoring (HPSM).
RFC8255 - Multiple Language Content Type
This document defines the 'multipart/multilingual' content type, which is an addition to the Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) standard. This content type makes it possible to send one message that contains multiple language versions of the same information. The translations would be identified by a language tag and selected by the email client based on a user's language settings.
RFC8254 - Uniform Resource Name (URN) Namespace Registration Transition
The original registration procedure for formal Uniform Resource Name (URN) namespaces required IETF Consensus. That requirement discouraged some registrations and increased the risk for problems that could occur as a result. The requirements have now been changed by RFC 8141, which adopts a different model, focusing on encouraging registration and publication of information for all appropriate namespaces. This document clarifies the status of relevant older RFCs and confirms and documents advice to IANA about selected existing registrations. This document also obsoletes RFCs 3044 and 3187 and moves them to Historic status. These RFCs describe the ISSN and ISBN namespaces, which are now outdated because the descriptions reside in registration templates.
RFC8253 - PCEPS: Usage of TLS to Provide a Secure Transport for the Path Computation Element Communication Protocol (PCEP)
The Path Computation Element Communication Protocol (PCEP) defines the mechanisms for the communication between a Path Computation Client (PCC) and a Path Computation Element (PCE), or among PCEs. This document describes PCEPS -- the usage of Transport Layer Security (TLS) to provide a secure transport for PCEP. The additional security mechanisms are provided by the transport protocol supporting PCEP; therefore, they do not affect the flexibility and extensibility of PCEP.
RFC8252 - OAuth 2.0 for Native Apps
OAuth 2.0 authorization requests from native apps should only be made through external user-agents, primarily the user's browser. This specification details the security and usability reasons why this is the case and how native apps and authorization servers can implement this best practice.
RFC8251 - Updates to the Opus Audio Codec
This document addresses minor issues that were found in the specification of the Opus audio codec in RFC 6716. It updates the normative decoder implementation included in Appendix A of RFC 6716. The changes fix real and potential security-related issues, as well as minor quality-related issues.
RFC8250 - IPv6 Performance and Diagnostic Metrics (PDM) Destination Option
To assess performance problems, this document describes optional headers embedded in each packet that provide sequence numbers and timing information as a basis for measurements. Such measurements may be interpreted in real time or after the fact. This document specifies the Performance and Diagnostic Metrics (PDM) Destination Options header. The field limits, calculations, and usage in measurement of PDM are included in this document.
RFC8249 - Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL): MTU Negotiation
The base IETF TRILL (Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links) protocol has a TRILL campus-wide MTU feature, specified in RFCs 6325 and 7177, that assures that link-state changes can be successfully flooded throughout the campus while being able to take advantage of a campus-wide capability to support jumbo packets. This document specifies recommended updates to that MTU feature to take advantage, for appropriate link-local packets, of link-local MTUs that exceed the TRILL campus MTU. In addition, it specifies an efficient algorithm for local MTU testing. This document updates RFCs 6325, 7177, and 7780.
RFC8248 - Security Automation and Continuous Monitoring (SACM) Requirements
This document defines the scope and set of requirements for the Security Automation and Continuous Monitoring (SACM) architecture, data model, and transfer protocols. The requirements and scope are based on the agreed-upon use cases described in RFC 7632.
RFC8247 - Algorithm Implementation Requirements and Usage Guidance for the Internet Key Exchange Protocol Version 2 (IKEv2)
The IPsec series of protocols makes use of various cryptographic algorithms in order to provide security services. The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) protocol is used to negotiate the IPsec Security Association (IPsec SA) parameters, such as which algorithms should be used. To ensure interoperability between different implementations, it is necessary to specify a set of algorithm implementation requirements and usage guidance to ensure that there is at least one algorithm that all implementations support. This document updates RFC 7296 and obsoletes RFC 4307 in defining the current algorithm implementation requirements and usage guidance for IKEv2, and does minor cleaning up of the IKEv2 IANA registry. This document does not update the algorithms used for packet encryption using IPsec Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP).
RFC8246 - HTTP Immutable Responses
The immutable HTTP response Cache-Control extension allows servers to identify resources that will not be updated during their freshness lifetime. This ensures that a client never needs to revalidate a cached fresh resource to be certain it has not been modified.
RFC8245 - Rules for Designing Protocols Using the Generalized Packet/Message Format from RFC 5444
RFC 5444 specifies a generalized Mobile Ad Hoc Network (MANET) packet/message format and describes an intended use for multiplexed MANET routing protocol messages; this use is mandated by RFC 5498 when using the MANET port or protocol number that it specifies. This document updates RFC 5444 by providing rules and recommendations for how the multiplexer operates and how protocols can use the packet/message format. In particular, the mandatory rules prohibit a number of uses that have been suggested in various proposals and that would have led to interoperability problems, to the impediment of protocol extension development, and/or to an inability to use optional generic parsers.
RFC8244 - Special-Use Domain Names Problem Statement
The policy defined in RFC 6761 for IANA registrations in the "Special-Use Domain Names" registry has been shown, through experience, to present challenges that were not anticipated when RFC 6761 was written. This memo presents a list, intended to be comprehensive, of the problems that have since been identified. In addition, it reviews the history of domain names and summarizes current IETF publications and some publications from other organizations relating to Special-Use Domain Names.
RFC8243 - Alternatives for Multilevel Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL)
Although TRILL is based on IS-IS, which supports multilevel unicast routing, extending TRILL to multiple levels has challenges that are not addressed by the already-existing capabilities of IS-IS. One issue is with the handling of multi-destination packet distribution trees. Other issues are with TRILL switch nicknames. How are such nicknames allocated across a multilevel TRILL network? Do nicknames need to be unique across an entire multilevel TRILL network? Or can they merely be unique within each multilevel area?
RFC8242 - Interface to the Routing System (I2RS) Ephemeral State Requirements
"An Architecture for the Interface to the Routing System" (RFC 7921) abstractly describes a number of requirements for ephemeral state (in terms of capabilities and behaviors) that any protocol suite attempting to meet the needs of the Interface to the Routing System (I2RS) protocol has to provide. This document describes, in detail, requirements for ephemeral state for those implementing the I2RS protocol.
RFC8241 - Interface to the Routing System (I2RS) Security-Related Requirements
This document presents security-related requirements for the Interface to the Routing System (I2RS) protocol, which provides a new interface to the routing system described in the I2RS architecture document (RFC 7921). The I2RS protocol is implemented by reusing portions of existing IETF protocols and adding new features to them. One such reuse is of the security features of a secure transport (e.g., Transport Layer Security (TLS), Secure SHell (SSH) Protocol, Datagram TLS (DTLS)) such as encryption, message integrity, mutual peer authentication, and anti-replay protection. The new I2RS features to consider from a security perspective are as follows: a priority mechanism to handle multi-headed write transactions, an opaque secondary identifier that identifies an application using the I2RS client, and an extremely constrained read-only non-secure transport.
RFC8240 - Report from the Internet of Things Software Update (IoTSU) Workshop 2016
This document provides a summary of the Internet of Things Software Update (IoTSU) Workshop that took place at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland on the 13th and 14th of June, 2016. The main goal of the workshop was to foster a discussion on requirements, challenges, and solutions for bringing software and firmware updates to IoT devices. This report summarizes the discussions and lists recommendations to the standards community.
RFC8239 - Data Center Benchmarking Methodology
The purpose of this informational document is to establish test and evaluation methodology and measurement techniques for physical network equipment in the data center. RFC 8238 is a prerequisite for this document, as it contains terminology that is considered normative. Many of these terms and methods may be applicable beyond the scope of this document as the technologies originally applied in the data center are deployed elsewhere.
RFC8238 - Data Center Benchmarking Terminology
The purposes of this informational document are to establish definitions and describe measurement techniques for data center benchmarking, as well as to introduce new terminology applicable to performance evaluations of data center network equipment. This document establishes the important concepts for benchmarking network switches and routers in the data center and is a prerequisite for the test methodology document (RFC 8239). Many of these terms and methods may be applicable to network equipment beyond the scope of this document as the technologies originally applied in the data center are deployed elsewhere.
RFC8237 - MPLS Label Switched Path (LSP) Pseudowire (PW) Status Refresh Reduction for Static PWs
This document describes a method for generating an aggregated pseudowire (PW) status message transmitted for a statically configured PW on a Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Label Switched Path (LSP) to indicate the status of one or more PWs carried on the LSP.
RFC8236 - J-PAKE: Password-Authenticated Key Exchange by Juggling
This document specifies a Password-Authenticated Key Exchange by Juggling (J-PAKE) protocol. This protocol allows the establishment of a secure end-to-end communication channel between two remote parties over an insecure network solely based on a shared password, without requiring a Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) or any trusted third party.
RFC8235 - Schnorr Non-interactive Zero-Knowledge Proof
This document describes the Schnorr non-interactive zero-knowledge (NIZK) proof, a non-interactive variant of the three-pass Schnorr identification scheme. The Schnorr NIZK proof allows one to prove the knowledge of a discrete logarithm without leaking any information about its value. It can serve as a useful building block for many cryptographic protocols to ensure that participants follow the protocol specification honestly. This document specifies the Schnorr NIZK proof in both the finite field and the elliptic curve settings.
RFC8234 - Updates to MPLS Transport Profile (MPLS-TP) Linear Protection in Automatic Protection Switching (APS) Mode
This document contains updates to MPLS Transport Profile (MPLS-TP) linear protection in Automatic Protection Switching (APS) mode defined in RFC 7271. The updates provide rules related to the initialization of the Protection State Coordination (PSC) Control Logic (in which the state machine resides) when operating in APS mode and clarify the operation related to state transition table lookup.
RFC8233 - Extensions to the Path Computation Element Communication Protocol (PCEP) to Compute Service-Aware Label Switched Paths (LSPs)
In certain networks, such as, but not limited to, financial information networks (e.g., stock market data providers), network performance criteria (e.g., latency) are becoming as critical to data path selection as other metrics and constraints. These metrics are associated with the Service Level Agreement (SLA) between customers and service providers. The link bandwidth utilization (the total bandwidth of a link in actual use for the forwarding) is another important factor to consider during path computation.
RFC8232 - Optimizations of Label Switched Path State Synchronization Procedures for a Stateful PCE
A stateful Path Computation Element (PCE) has access to not only the information disseminated by the network's Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) but also the set of active paths and their reserved resources for its computation. The additional Label Switched Path (LSP) state information allows the PCE to compute constrained paths while considering individual LSPs and their interactions. This requires a State Synchronization mechanism between the PCE and the network, the PCE and Path Computation Clients (PCCs), and cooperating PCEs. The basic mechanism for State Synchronization is part of the stateful PCE specification. This document presents motivations for optimizations to the base State Synchronization procedure and specifies the required Path Computation Element Communication Protocol (PCEP) extensions.
RFC8231 - Path Computation Element Communication Protocol (PCEP) Extensions for Stateful PCE
The Path Computation Element Communication Protocol (PCEP) provides mechanisms for Path Computation Elements (PCEs) to perform path computations in response to Path Computation Client (PCC) requests.
RFC8230 - Using RSA Algorithms with CBOR Object Signing and Encryption (COSE) Messages
The CBOR Object Signing and Encryption (COSE) specification defines cryptographic message encodings using Concise Binary Object Representation (CBOR). This specification defines algorithm encodings and representations enabling RSA algorithms to be used for COSE messages. Encodings are specified for the use of RSA Probabilistic Signature Scheme (RSASSA-PSS) signatures, RSA Encryption Scheme - Optimal Asymmetric Encryption Padding (RSAES-OAEP) encryption, and RSA keys.
RFC8229 - TCP Encapsulation of IKE and IPsec Packets
This document describes a method to transport Internet Key Exchange Protocol (IKE) and IPsec packets over a TCP connection for traversing network middleboxes that may block IKE negotiation over UDP. This method, referred to as "TCP encapsulation", involves sending both IKE packets for Security Association establishment and Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) packets over a TCP connection. This method is intended to be used as a fallback option when IKE cannot be negotiated over UDP.
RFC8228 - Guidance on Designing Label Generation Rulesets (LGRs) Supporting Variant Labels
Rules for validating identifier labels and alternate representations of those labels (variants) are known as Label Generation Rulesets (LGRs); they are used for the implementation of identifier systems such as Internationalized Domain Names (IDNs). This document describes ways to design LGRs to support variant labels. In designing LGRs, it is important to ensure that the label generation rules are consistent and well behaved in the presence of variants. The design decisions can then be expressed using the XML representation of LGRs that is defined in RFC 7940.
RFC8227 - MPLS-TP Shared-Ring Protection (MSRP) Mechanism for Ring Topology
This document describes requirements, architecture, and solutions for MPLS-TP Shared-Ring Protection (MSRP) in a ring topology for point- to-point (P2P) services. The MSRP mechanism is described to meet the ring protection requirements as described in RFC 5654. This document defines the Ring Protection Switching (RPS) protocol that is used to coordinate the protection behavior of the nodes on an MPLS ring.
RFC8226 - Secure Telephone Identity Credentials: Certificates
In order to prevent the impersonation of telephone numbers on the Internet, some kind of credential system needs to exist that cryptographically asserts authority over telephone numbers. This document describes the use of certificates in establishing authority over telephone numbers, as a component of a broader architecture for managing telephone numbers as identities in protocols like SIP.
RFC8225 - PASSporT: Personal Assertion Token
This document defines a method for creating and validating a token that cryptographically verifies an originating identity or, more generally, a URI or telephone number representing the originator of personal communications. The Personal Assertion Token, PASSporT, is cryptographically signed to protect the integrity of the identity of the originator and to verify the assertion of the identity information at the destination. The cryptographic signature is defined with the intention that it can confidently verify the originating persona even when the signature is sent to the destination party over an insecure channel. PASSporT is particularly useful for many personal-communications applications over IP networks and other multi-hop interconnection scenarios where the originating and destination parties may not have a direct trusted relationship.
RFC8224 - Authenticated Identity Management in the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)
The baseline security mechanisms in the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) are inadequate for cryptographically assuring the identity of the end users that originate SIP requests, especially in an interdomain context. This document defines a mechanism for securely identifying originators of SIP requests. It does so by defining a SIP header field for conveying a signature used for validating the identity and for conveying a reference to the credentials of the signer.
RFC8223 - Application-Aware Targeted LDP
Recent Targeted Label Distribution Protocol (tLDP) applications, such as remote Loop-Free Alternates (LFAs) and BGP auto-discovered pseudowires, may automatically establish a tLDP session with any Label Switching Router (LSR) in a network. The initiating LSR has information about the targeted applications to administratively control initiation of the session. However, the responding LSR has no such information to control acceptance of this session. This document defines a mechanism to advertise and negotiate the Targeted Application Capability (TAC) during LDP session initialization. As the responding LSR becomes aware of targeted applications, it may establish a limited number of tLDP sessions for certain applications. In addition, each targeted application is mapped to LDP Forwarding Equivalence Class (FEC) elements to advertise only necessary LDP FEC label bindings over the session. This document updates RFC 7473 for enabling advertisement of LDP FEC label bindings over the session.
RFC8222 - Selecting Labels for Use with Conventional DNS and Other Resolution Systems in DNS-Based Service Discovery
Despite its name, DNS-Based Service Discovery (DNS-SD) can use naming systems other than DNS when looking for services. Moreover, when it uses DNS, DNS-SD uses the full capability of DNS, rather than using a subset of available octets. This is of particular relevance where some environments use DNS labels that conform to Internationalized Domain Names for Applications (IDNA), and other environments use labels containing Unicode characters (such as containing octets corresponding to characters encoded as UTF-8). In order for DNS-SD to be used effectively in environments where multiple different name systems and conventions for their operation are in use, it is important to attend to differences in the underlying technology and operational environment. This memo presents an outline of the requirements for the selection of labels for conventional DNS and other resolution systems when they are expected to interoperate in this manner.
RFC8221 - Cryptographic Algorithm Implementation Requirements and Usage Guidance for Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) and Authentication Header (AH)
This document replaces RFC 7321, "Cryptographic Algorithm Implementation Requirements and Usage Guidance for Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) and Authentication Header (AH)". The goal of this document is to enable ESP and AH to benefit from cryptography that is up to date while making IPsec interoperable.
RFC8220 - Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) over Virtual Private LAN Service (VPLS)
This document describes the procedures and recommendations for Virtual Private LAN Service (VPLS) Provider Edges (PEs) to facilitate replication of multicast traffic to only certain ports (behind which there are interested Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) routers and/or Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) hosts) via PIM snooping and proxying.
RFC8219 - Benchmarking Methodology for IPv6 Transition Technologies
Benchmarking methodologies that address the performance of network interconnect devices that are IPv4- or IPv6-capable exist, but the IPv6 transition technologies are outside of their scope. This document provides complementary guidelines for evaluating the performance of IPv6 transition technologies. More specifically, this document targets IPv6 transition technologies that employ encapsulation or translation mechanisms, as dual-stack nodes can be tested using the recommendations of RFCs 2544 and 5180. The methodology also includes a metric for benchmarking load scalability.
RFC8218 - Multipath Extension for the Optimized Link State Routing Protocol Version 2 (OLSRv2)
This document specifies a multipath extension for the Optimized Link State Routing Protocol version 2 (OLSRv2) to discover multiple disjoint paths for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANETs). Considering the characteristics of MANETs, especially the dynamic network topology, using multiple paths can increase aggregated throughput and improve the reliability by avoiding single route failures. The interoperability with OLSRv2 is retained.
RFC8217 - Clarifications for When to Use the name-addr Production in SIP Messages
RFC 3261 constrained several SIP header fields whose grammar contains the "name-addr / addr-spec" alternative to use name-addr when certain characters appear. Unfortunately, it expressed the constraints with prose copied into each header field definition, and at least one header field was missed. Further, the constraint has not been copied into documents defining extension headers whose grammar contains the alternative.
RFC8216 - HTTP Live Streaming
This document describes a protocol for transferring unbounded streams of multimedia data. It specifies the data format of the files and the actions to be taken by the server (sender) and the clients (receivers) of the streams. It describes version 7 of this protocol.
RFC8215 - Local-Use IPv4/IPv6 Translation Prefix
This document reserves the IPv6 prefix 64:ff9b:1::/48 for local use within domains that enable IPv4/IPv6 translation mechanisms.
RFC8214 - Virtual Private Wire Service Support in Ethernet VPN
This document describes how Ethernet VPN (EVPN) can be used to support the Virtual Private Wire Service (VPWS) in MPLS/IP networks. EVPN accomplishes the following for VPWS: provides Single-Active as well as All-Active multihoming with flow-based load-balancing, eliminates the need for Pseudowire (PW) signaling, and provides fast protection convergence upon node or link failure.
RFC8213 - Security of Messages Exchanged between Servers and Relay Agents
The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for IPv4 (DHCPv4) has no guidance for how to secure messages exchanged between servers and relay agents. The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for IPv6 (DHCPv6) states that IPsec should be used to secure messages exchanged between servers and relay agents but does not require encryption. With recent concerns about pervasive monitoring and other attacks, it is appropriate to require securing relay-to-relay and relay-to-server communication for DHCPv6 and relay-to-server communication for DHCPv4.