RFC Abstracts

RFC3735 - Guidelines for Extending the Extensible Provisioning Protocol (EPP)
The Extensible Provisioning Protocol (EPP) is an application layer client-server protocol for the provisioning and management of objects stored in a shared central repository. Specified in XML, the protocol defines generic object management operations and an extensible framework that maps protocol operations to objects. This document presents guidelines for use of EPP's extension mechanisms to define new features and object management capabilities. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3734 - Extensible Provisioning Protocol (EPP) Transport Over TCP
This document describes how an Extensible Provisioning Protocol (EPP) session is mapped onto a single Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) connection. This mapping requires use of the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol to protect information exchanged between an EPP client and an EPP server. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3733 - Extensible Provisioning Protocol (EPP) Contact Mapping
This document describes an Extensible Provisioning Protocol (EPP) mapping for the provisioning and management of individual or organizational social information identifiers (known as "contacts") stored in a shared central repository. Specified in Extensible Markup Language (XML), the mapping defines EPP command syntax and semantics as applied to contacts. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3732 - Extensible Provisioning Protocol (EPP) Host Mapping
This document describes an Extensible Provisioning Protocol (EPP) mapping for the provisioning and management of Internet host names stored in a shared central repository. Specified in XML, the mapping defines EPP command syntax and semantics as applied to host names. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3731 - Extensible Provisioning Protocol (EPP) Domain Name Mapping
This document describes an Extensible Provisioning Protocol (EPP) mapping for the provisioning and management of Internet domain names stored in a shared central repository. Specified in XML, the mapping defines EPP command syntax and semantics as applied to domain names. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3730 - Extensible Provisioning Protocol (EPP)
This document describes an application layer client-server protocol for the provisioning and management of objects stored in a shared central repository. Specified in XML, the protocol defines generic object management operations and an extensible framework that maps protocol operations to objects. This document includes a protocol specification, an object mapping template, and an XML media type registration. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3729 - Application Performance Measurement MIB
This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB) for use with network management protocols in TCP/IP-based internets. In particular, it defines objects for measuring the application performance as experienced by end-users. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3728 - Definitions of Managed Objects for Very High Speed Digital Subscriber Lines (VDSL)
This document defines a Management Information Base (MIB) module for use with network management protocols in the Internet community. In particular, it describes objects used for managing Very High Speed Digital Subscriber Line (VDSL) interfaces. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3727 - ASN.1 Module Definition for the LDAP and X.500 Component Matching Rules
This document updates the specification of the component matching rules for Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) and X.500 directories (RFC3687) by collecting the Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1) definitions of the component matching rules into an appropriately identified ASN.1 module so that other specifications may reference the component matching rule definitions from within their own ASN.1 modules. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3726 - Requirements for Signaling Protocols
This document defines requirements for signaling across different network environments, such as across administrative and/or technology domains. Signaling is mainly considered for Quality of Service (Qos) such as the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP). However, in recent years, several other applications of signaling have been defined. For example, signaling for label distribution in Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) or signaling to middleboxes. To achieve wide applicability of the requirements, the starting point is a diverse set of scenarios/use cases concerning various types of networks and application interactions. This document presents the assumptions before listing the requirements. The requirements are grouped according to areas such as architecture and design goals, signaling flows, layering, performance, flexibility, security, and mobility. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3725 - Best Current Practices for Third Party Call Control (3pcc) in the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)
Third party call control refers to the ability of one entity to create a call in which communication is actually between other parties. Third party call control is possible using the mechanisms specified within the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP). However, there are several possible approaches, each with different benefits and drawbacks. This document discusses best current practices for the usage of SIP for third party call control. This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC3724 - The Rise of the Middle and the Future of End-to-End: Reflections on the Evolution of the Internet Architecture
The end-to-end principle is the core architectural guideline of the Internet. In this document, we briefly examine the development of the end-to-end principle as it has been applied to the Internet architecture over the years. We discuss current trends in the evolution of the Internet architecture in relation to the end-to-end principle, and try to draw some conclusion about the evolution of the end-to-end principle, and thus for the Internet architecture which it supports, in light of these current trends. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3723 - Securing Block Storage Protocols over IP
This document discusses how to secure block storage and storage discovery protocols running over IP (Internet Protocol) using IPsec and IKE (Internet Key Exchange). Threat models and security protocols are developed for iSCSI (Internet Protocol Small Computer System Interface), iFCP (Internet Fibre Channel Storage Networking) and FCIP (Fibre Channel over TCP/IP), as well as the iSNS (Internet Storage Name Server) and SLPv2 (Service Location Protocol v2) discovery protocols. Performance issues and resource constraints are analyzed. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3722 - String Profile for Internet Small Computer Systems Interface (iSCSI) Names
This document describes how to prepare internationalized iSCSI names to increase the likelihood that name input and comparison work in ways that make sense for typical users throughout the world. The Internet Small Computer Systems Interface (iSCSI) protocol provides a way for hosts to access SCSI devices over an IP network. The iSCSI end-points, called initiators and targets, each have a globally-unique name that must be transcribable, as well as easily compared. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3721 - Internet Small Computer Systems Interface (iSCSI) Naming and Discovery
This document provides examples of the Internet Small Computer Systems Interface (iSCSI; or SCSI over TCP) name construction and discussion of discovery of iSCSI resources (targets) by iSCSI initiators. This document complements the iSCSI protocol document. Flexibility is the key guiding principle behind this document. That is, an effort has been made to satisfy the needs of both small isolated environments, as well as large environments requiring secure/scalable solutions. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3720 - Internet Small Computer Systems Interface (iSCSI)
This document describes a transport protocol for Internet Small Computer Systems Interface (iSCSI) that works on top of TCP. The iSCSI protocol aims to be fully compliant with the standardized SCSI architecture model. SCSI is a popular family of protocols that enable systems to communicate with I/O devices, especially storage devices. SCSI protocols are request/response application protocols with a common standardized architecture model and basic command set, as well as standardized command sets for different device classes (disks, tapes, media-changers etc.). As system interconnects move from the classical bus structure to a network structure, SCSI has to be mapped to network transport protocols. IP networks now meet the performance requirements of fast system interconnects and as such are good candidates to "carry" SCSI. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3719 - Recommendations for Interoperable Networks using Intermediate System to Intermediate System (IS-IS)
This document discusses a number of differences between the Intermediate System to Intermediate System (IS-IS) protocol as described in ISO 10589 and the protocol as it is deployed today. These differences are discussed as a service to those implementing, testing, and deploying the IS-IS Protocol. A companion document discusses differences between the protocol described in RFC 1195 and the protocol as it is deployed today for routing IP traffic. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3718 - A Summary of Unicode Consortium Procedures, Policies, Stability, and Public Access
This memo describes various internal workings of the Unicode Consortium for the benefit of participants in the IETF. It is intended solely for informational purposes. Included are discussions of how the decision-making bodies of the Consortium work and their procedures, as well as information on public access to the character encoding & standardization processes.
RFC3717 - IP over Optical Networks: A Framework
The Internet transport infrastructure is moving towards a model of high-speed routers interconnected by optical core networks. The architectural choices for the interaction between IP and optical network layers, specifically, the routing and signaling aspects, are maturing. At the same time, a consensus has emerged in the industry on utilizing IP-based protocols for the optical control plane. This document defines a framework for IP over Optical networks, considering both the IP-based control plane for optical networks as well as IP-optical network interactions (together referred to as "IP over optical networks"). This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3716 - IETF in the Large: Administration and Execution
In the fall of 2003, the IETF Chair and the IAB Chair formed an IAB Advisory Committee (AdvComm), with a mandate to review the existing IETF administrative structure and relationships (RFC Editor, IETF Secretariat, IANA) and to propose changes to the IETF management process or structure to improve the overall functioning of the IETF. The AdvComm mandate did not include the standards process itself. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3715 - IPsec-Network Address Translation (NAT) Compatibility Requirements
This document describes known incompatibilities between Network Address Translation (NAT) and IPsec, and describes the requirements for addressing them. Perhaps the most common use of IPsec is in providing virtual private networking capabilities. One very popular use of Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) is to provide telecommuter access to the corporate Intranet. Today, NATs are widely deployed in home gateways, as well as in other locations likely to be used by telecommuters, such as hotels. The result is that IPsec-NAT incompatibilities have become a major barrier in the deployment of IPsec in one of its principal uses. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3714 - IAB Concerns Regarding Congestion Control for Voice Traffic in the Internet
This document discusses IAB concerns about effective end-to-end congestion control for best-effort voice traffic in the Internet. These concerns have to do with fairness, user quality, and with the dangers of congestion collapse. The concerns are particularly relevant in light of the absence of a widespread Quality of Service (QoS) deployment in the Internet, and the likelihood that this situation will not change much in the near term. This document is not making any recommendations about deployment paths for Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) in terms of QoS support, and is not claiming that best-effort service can be relied upon to give acceptable performance for VoIP. We are merely observing that voice traffic is occasionally deployed as best-effort traffic over some links in the Internet, that we expect this occasional deployment to continue, and that we have concerns about the lack of effective end-to-end congestion control for this best-effort voice traffic. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3713 - A Description of the Camellia Encryption Algorithm
This document describes the Camellia encryption algorithm. Camellia is a block cipher with 128-bit block size and 128-, 192-, and 256-bit keys. The algorithm description is presented together with key scheduling part and data randomizing part. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3712 - Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP): Schema for Printer Services
This document defines a schema, object classes and attributes, for printers and printer services, for use with directories that support Lightweight Directory Access Protocol v3 (LDAP-TS). This document is based on the printer attributes listed in Appendix E of Internet Printing Protocol/1.1 (IPP) (RFC 2911). A few additional printer attributes are based on definitions in the Printer MIB (RFC 1759). This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3711 - The Secure Real-time Transport Protocol (SRTP)
This document describes the Secure Real-time Transport Protocol (SRTP), a profile of the Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP), which can provide confidentiality, message authentication, and replay protection to the RTP traffic and to the control traffic for RTP, the Real-time Transport Control Protocol (RTCP). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3710 - An IESG charter
This memo provides a charter for the Internet Engineering Steering Group (IESG), a management function of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). It is meant to document the charter of the IESG as it is presently understood. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3709 - Internet X.509 Public Key Infrastructure: Logotypes in X.509 Certificates
This document specifies a certificate extension for including logotypes in public key certificates and attribute certificates. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3708 - Using TCP Duplicate Selective Acknowledgement (DSACKs) and Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) Duplicate Transmission Sequence Numbers (TSNs) to Detect Spurious Retransmissions
TCP and Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) provide notification of duplicate segment receipt through Duplicate Selective Acknowledgement (DSACKs) and Duplicate Transmission Sequence Number (TSN) notification, respectively. This document presents conservative methods of using this information to identify unnecessary retransmissions for various applications. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC3707 - Cross Registry Internet Service Protocol (CRISP) Requirements
Internet registries expose administrative and operational data via varying directory services. This document defines functional requirements for the directory services of domain registries and the common base requirements for extending the use of these services for other types of Internet registries. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3706 - A Traffic-Based Method of Detecting Dead Internet Key Exchange (IKE) Peers
This document describes the method detecting a dead Internet Key Exchange (IKE) peer that is presently in use by a number of vendors. The method, called Dead Peer Detection (DPD) uses IPSec traffic patterns to minimize the number of IKE messages that are needed to confirm liveness. DPD, like other keepalive mechanisms, is needed to determine when to perform IKE peer failover, and to reclaim lost resources. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3705 - High Capacity Textual Conventions for MIB Modules Using Performance History Based on 15 Minute Intervals
This document presents a set of High Capacity Textual Conventions for use in MIB modules which require performance history based upon 15 minute intervals. The Textual Conventions defined in this document extend the conventions presented in RFC 3593 to 64 bit resolution using the conventions presented in RFC 2856. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3704 - Ingress Filtering for Multihomed Networks
BCP 38, RFC 2827, is designed to limit the impact of distributed denial of service attacks, by denying traffic with spoofed addresses access to the network, and to help ensure that traffic is traceable to its correct source network. As a side effect of protecting the Internet against such attacks, the network implementing the solution also protects itself from this and other attacks, such as spoofed management access to networking equipment. There are cases when this may create problems, e.g., with multihoming. This document describes the current ingress filtering operational mechanisms, examines generic issues related to ingress filtering, and delves into the effects on multihoming in particular. This memo updates RFC 2827. This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC3703 - Policy Core Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) Schema
This document defines a mapping of the Policy Core Information Model to a form that can be implemented in a directory that uses Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) as its access protocol. This model defines two hierarchies of object classes: structural classes representing information for representing and controlling policy data as specified in RFC 3060, and relationship classes that indicate how instances of the structural classes are related to each other. Classes are also added to the LDAP schema to improve the performance of a client's interactions with an LDAP server when the client is retrieving large amounts of policy-related information. These classes exist only to optimize LDAP retrievals: there are no classes in the information model that correspond to them. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3702 - Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting Requirements for the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)
As Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) services are deployed on the Internet, there is a need for authentication, authorization, and accounting of SIP sessions. This document sets out the basic requirements for this work. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3701 - 6bone (IPv6 Testing Address Allocation) Phaseout
The 6bone was established in 1996 by the IETF as an IPv6 Testbed network to enable various IPv6 testing as well as to assist in the transitioning of IPv6 into the Internet. It operates under the IPv6 address allocation 3FFE::/16 from RFC 2471. As IPv6 is beginning its production deployment it is appropriate to plan for the phaseout of the 6bone. This document establishes a plan for a multi-year phaseout of the 6bone and its address allocation on the assumption that the IETF is the appropriate place to determine this. This document obsoletes RFC 2471, "IPv6 Testing Address Allocation", December, 1998. RFC 2471 will become historic. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3700 - Internet Official Protocol Standards
This memo contains a snapshot of the state of standardization of protocols used in the Internet as of July 22, 2004. It lists official protocol standards and Best Current Practice RFCs; it is not a complete index to the RFC series. The latest version of this memo is designated STD 1. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3698 - Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP): Additional Matching Rules
This document provides a collection of matching rules for use with the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP). As these matching rules are simple adaptations of matching rules specified for use with the X.500 Directory, most are already in wide use. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3697 - IPv6 Flow Label Specification
This document specifies the IPv6 Flow Label field and the minimum requirements for IPv6 source nodes labeling flows, IPv6 nodes forwarding labeled packets, and flow state establishment methods. Even when mentioned as examples of possible uses of the flow labeling, more detailed requirements for specific use cases are out of scope for this document. The usage of the Flow Label field enables efficient IPv6 flow classification based only on IPv6 main header fields in fixed positions. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3696 - Application Techniques for Checking and Transformation of Names
Many Internet applications have been designed to deduce top-level domains (or other domain name labels) from partial information. The introduction of new top-level domains, especially non-country-code ones, has exposed flaws in some of the methods used by these applications. These flaws make it more difficult, or impossible, for users of the applications to access the full Internet. This memo discusses some of the techniques that have been used and gives some guidance for minimizing their negative impact as the domain name environment evolves. This document draws summaries of the applicable rules together in one place and supplies references to the actual standards. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3695 - Compact Forward Error Correction (FEC) Schemes
This document introduces some Forward Error Correction (FEC) schemes that supplement the FEC schemes described in RFC 3452. The primary benefits of these additional FEC schemes are that they are designed for reliable bulk delivery of large objects using a more compact FEC Payload ID, and they can be used to sequentially deliver blocks of an object of indeterminate length. Thus, they more flexibly support different delivery models with less packet header overhead. This document also describes the Fully-Specified FEC scheme corresponding to FEC Encoding ID 0. This Fully-Specified FEC scheme requires no FEC coding and is introduced primarily to allow simple interoperability testing between different implementations of protocol instantiations that use the FEC building block. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC3694 - Threat Analysis of the Geopriv Protocol
This document provides some analysis of threats against the Geopriv protocol architecture. It focuses on protocol threats, threats that result from the storage of data by entities in the architecture, and threats posed by the abuse of information yielded by Geopriv. Some security properties that meet these threats are enumerated as a reference for Geopriv requirements. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3693 - Geopriv Requirements
Location-based services, navigation applications, emergency services, management of equipment in the field, and other location-dependent services need geographic location information about a Target (such as a user, resource or other entity). There is a need to securely gather and transfer location information for location services, while at the same time protect the privacy of the individuals involved. This document focuses on the authorization, security and privacy requirements for such location-dependent services. Specifically, it describes the requirements for the Geopriv Location Object (LO) and for the protocols that use this Location Object. This LO is envisioned to be the primary data structure used in all Geopriv protocol exchanges to securely transfer location data. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3692 - Assigning Experimental and Testing Numbers Considered Useful
When experimenting with or extending protocols, it is often necessary to use some sort of protocol number or constant in order to actually test or experiment with the new function, even when testing in a closed environment. For example, to test a new DHCP option, one needs an option number to identify the new function. This document recommends that when writing IANA Considerations sections, authors should consider assigning a small range of numbers for experimentation purposes that implementers can use when testing protocol extensions or other new features. This document reserves some ranges of numbers for experimentation purposes in specific protocols where the need to support experimentation has been identified.
RFC3691 - Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP) UNSELECT command
This document defines an UNSELECT command that can be used to close the current mailbox in an Internet Message Access Protocol - version 4 (IMAP4) session without expunging it. Certain types of IMAP clients need to release resources associated with the selected mailbox without selecting a different mailbox. While IMAP4 provides this functionality (via a SELECT command with a nonexistent mailbox name or reselecting the same mailbox with EXAMINE command), a more clean solution is desirable. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC3690 - IP Telephony Requirements for Emergency Telecommunication Service (ETS)
This document presents a list of requirements in support of Emergency Telecommunications Service (ETS) within the context of IP telephony. It is an extension to the general requirements presented in RFC 3689. Solutions to these requirements are not presented in this document. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3689 - General Requirements for Emergency Telecommunication Service (ETS)
This document presents a list of general requirements in support of Emergency Telecommunications Service (ETS). Solutions to these requirements are not presented in this document. Additional requirements pertaining to specific applications, or types of applications, are to be specified in separate document(s). This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC3688 - The IETF XML Registry
This document describes an IANA maintained registry for IETF standards which use Extensible Markup Language (XML) related items such as Namespaces, Document Type Declarations (DTDs), Schemas, and Resource Description Framework (RDF) Schemas.
RFC3687 - Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) and X.500 Component Matching Rules
The syntaxes of attributes in a Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) or X.500 directory range from simple data types, such as text string, integer, or boolean, to complex structured data types, such as the syntaxes of the directory schema operational attributes. Matching rules defined for the complex syntaxes usually only provide the most immediately useful matching capability. This document defines generic matching rules that can match any user selected component parts in an attribute value of any arbitrarily complex attribute syntax. [PROPOSED STANDARD]
RFC3686 - Using Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) Counter Mode With IPsec Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
This document describes the use of Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) Counter Mode, with an explicit initialization vector, as an IPsec Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) confidentiality mechanism.
RFC3685 - SIEVE Email Filtering: Spamtest and VirusTest Extensions
The SIEVE mail filtering language "spamtest" and "virustest" extensions permit users to use simple, portable commands for spam and virus tests on email messages. Each extension provides a new test using matches against numeric 'scores'. It is the responsibility of the underlying SIEVE implementation to do the actual checks that result in values returned by the tests. [PROPOSED STANDARD]