RFC Abstracts

RFC5639 - Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) Brainpool Standard Curves and Curve Generation
This memo proposes several elliptic curve domain parameters over finite prime fields for use in cryptographic applications. The domain parameters are consistent with the relevant international standards, and can be used in X.509 certificates and certificate revocation lists (CRLs), for Internet Key Exchange (IKE), Transport Layer Security (TLS), XML signatures, and all applications or protocols based on the cryptographic message syntax (CMS). This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is published for informational purposes.
RFC5638 - Simple SIP Usage Scenario for Applications in the Endpoints
For Internet-centric usage, the number of SIP-required standards for presence and IM and audio/video communications can be drastically smaller than what has been published by using only the rendezvous and session-initiation capabilities of SIP. The simplification is achieved by avoiding the emulation of telephony and its model of the intelligent network. 'Simple SIP' relies on powerful computing endpoints. Simple SIP desktop applications can be combined with rich Internet applications (RIAs). Significant telephony features may also be implemented in the endpoints.
RFC5637 - Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA) Goals for Mobile IPv6
In commercial and enterprise deployments, Mobile IPv6 can be a service offered by a Mobility Services Provider (MSP). In this case, all protocol operations may need to be explicitly authorized and traced, requiring the interaction between Mobile IPv6 and the AAA infrastructure. Integrating the Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA) infrastructure (e.g., Network Access Server and AAA server) also offers a solution component for Mobile IPv6 bootstrapping. This document describes various scenarios where a AAA interface for Mobile IPv6 is required. Additionally, it lists design goals and requirements for such an interface. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5636 - Traceable Anonymous Certificate
This document defines a practical architecture and protocols for offering privacy for a user who requests and uses an X.509 certificate containing a pseudonym, while still retaining the ability to map such a certificate to the real user who requested it. The architecture is compatible with IETF certificate request formats such as PKCS10 (RFC 2986) and CMC (RFC 5272). The architecture separates the authorities involved in issuing a certificate: one for verifying ownership of a private key (Blind Issuer) and the other for validating the contents of a certificate (Anonymity Issuer). The end entity (EE) certificates issued under this model are called Traceable Anonymous Certificates (TACs). This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC5635 - Remote Triggered Black Hole Filtering with Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (uRPF)
Remote Triggered Black Hole (RTBH) filtering is a popular and effective technique for the mitigation of denial-of-service attacks. This document expands upon destination-based RTBH filtering by outlining a method to enable filtering by source address as well. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5634 - Quick-Start for the Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP)
This document specifies the use of the Quick-Start mechanism by the Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP). DCCP is a transport protocol that allows the transmission of congestion-controlled, unreliable datagrams. DCCP is intended for applications such as streaming media, Internet telephony, and online games. In DCCP, an application has a choice of congestion control mechanisms, each specified by a Congestion Control Identifier (CCID). This document specifies general procedures applicable to all DCCP CCIDs and specific procedures for the use of Quick-Start with DCCP CCID 2, CCID 3, and CCID 4. Quick-Start enables a DCCP sender to cooperate with Quick-Start routers along the end-to-end path to determine an allowed sending rate at the start of a connection and, at times, in the middle of a DCCP connection (e.g., after an idle or application- limited period). The present specification is provided for use in controlled environments, and not as a mechanism that would be intended or appropriate for ubiquitous deployment in the global Internet. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC5633 - Nominating Committee Process: Earlier Announcement of Open Positions and Solicitation of Volunteers
This document updates RFC 3777, Section 4, Bullet 13 to allow announcement of open positions and solicitation of volunteers to be issued before a Nominating and Recall Committee Chair has been named by the Internet Society President. This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC5632 - Comcast's ISP Experiences in a Proactive Network Provider Participation for P2P (P4P) Technical Trial
This document describes the experiences of Comcast, a large cable broadband Internet Service Provider (ISP) in the U.S., in a Proactive Network Provider Participation for P2P (P4P) technical trial in July 2008. This trial used P4P iTracker technology, which is being considered by the IETF as part of the Application Layer Transport Optimization (ALTO) working group. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5631 - Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) Session Mobility
Session mobility is the transfer of media of an ongoing communication session from one device to another. This document describes the basic approaches and shows the signaling and media flow examples for providing this service using the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP). Service discovery is essential to locate targets for session transfer and is discussed using the Service Location Protocol (SLP) as an example. This document is an informational document. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5630 - The Use of the SIPS URI Scheme in the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)
This document provides clarifications and guidelines concerning the use of the SIPS URI scheme in the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP). It also makes normative changes to SIP. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5629 - A Framework for Application Interaction in the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)
This document describes a framework for the interaction between users and Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) based applications. By interacting with applications, users can guide the way in which they operate. The focus of this framework is stimulus signaling, which allows a user agent (UA) to interact with an application without knowledge of the semantics of that application. Stimulus signaling can occur to a user interface running locally with the client, or to a remote user interface, through media streams. Stimulus signaling encompasses a wide range of mechanisms, ranging from clicking on hyperlinks, to pressing buttons, to traditional Dual-Tone Multi- Frequency (DTMF) input. In all cases, stimulus signaling is supported through the use of markup languages, which play a key role in this framework. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5628 - Registration Event Package Extension for Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) Globally Routable User Agent URIs (GRUUs)
RFC 3680 defines a Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) event package for registration state. This package allows a watcher to learn about information stored by a SIP registrar, including its registered contact.
RFC5627 - Obtaining and Using Globally Routable User Agent URIs (GRUUs) in the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)
Several applications of the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) require a user agent (UA) to construct and distribute a URI that can be used by anyone on the Internet to route a call to that specific UA instance. A URI that routes to a specific UA instance is called a Globally Routable UA URI (GRUU). This document describes an extension to SIP for obtaining a GRUU from a registrar and for communicating a GRUU to a peer within a dialog. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5626 - Managing Client-Initiated Connections in the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)
The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) allows proxy servers to initiate TCP connections or to send asynchronous UDP datagrams to User Agents in order to deliver requests. However, in a large number of real deployments, many practical considerations, such as the existence of firewalls and Network Address Translators (NATs) or the use of TLS with server-provided certificates, prevent servers from connecting to User Agents in this way. This specification defines behaviors for User Agents, registrars, and proxy servers that allow requests to be delivered on existing connections established by the User Agent. It also defines keep-alive behaviors needed to keep NAT bindings open and specifies the usage of multiple connections from the User Agent to its registrar. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5625 - DNS Proxy Implementation Guidelines
This document provides guidelines for the implementation of DNS proxies, as found in broadband gateways and other similar network devices. This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC5624 - Quality of Service Parameters for Usage with Diameter
This document defines a number of Quality of Service (QoS) parameters that can be reused for conveying QoS information within Diameter.
RFC5623 - Framework for PCE-Based Inter-Layer MPLS and GMPLS Traffic Engineering
A network may comprise multiple layers. It is important to globally optimize network resource utilization, taking into account all layers rather than optimizing resource utilization at each layer independently. This allows better network efficiency to be achieved through a process that we call inter-layer traffic engineering. The Path Computation Element (PCE) can be a powerful tool to achieve inter-layer traffic engineering.
RFC5622 - Profile for Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP) Congestion ID 4: TCP-Friendly Rate Control for Small Packets (TFRC-SP)
This document specifies a profile for Congestion Control Identifier 4, the small-packet variant of TCP-Friendly Rate Control (TFRC), in the Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP). CCID 4 is for experimental use, and uses TFRC-SP (RFC 4828), a variant of TFRC designed for applications that send small packets. CCID 4 is considered experimental because TFRC-SP is itself experimental, and is not proposed for widespread deployment in the global Internet at this time. The goal for TFRC-SP is to achieve roughly the same bandwidth in bits per second (bps) as a TCP flow using packets of up to 1500 bytes but experiencing the same level of congestion. CCID 4 is for use for senders that send small packets and would like a TCP- friendly sending rate, possibly with Explicit Congestion Notification (ECN), while minimizing abrupt rate changes. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC5621 - Message Body Handling in the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)
This document specifies how message bodies are handled in SIP. Additionally, this document specifies SIP user agent support for MIME (Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions) in message bodies. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5620 - RFC Editor Model (Version 1)
The RFC Editor performs a number of functions that may be carried out by various persons or entities. The RFC Editor model presented in this document divides the responsibilities for the RFC Series into four functions: The RFC Series Editor, the Independent Submission Editor, the RFC Production Center, and the RFC Publisher. It also introduces the RFC Series Advisory Group and an (optional) Independent Submission Stream Editorial Board. The model outlined here is intended to increase flexibility and operational support options, provide for the orderly succession of the RFC Editor, and ensure the continuity of the RFC series, while maintaining RFC quality and timely processing, ensuring document accessibility, reducing costs, and increasing cost transparency. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5619 - Softwire Security Analysis and Requirements
This document describes security guidelines for the softwire "Hubs and Spokes" and "Mesh" solutions. Together with discussion of the softwire deployment scenarios, the vulnerability to security attacks is analyzed to provide security protection mechanisms such as authentication, integrity, and confidentiality to the softwire control and data packets. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5618 - Mixed Security Mode for the Two-Way Active Measurement Protocol (TWAMP)
This memo describes a simple extension to TWAMP (the Two-Way Active Measurement Protocol). The extension adds the option to use different security modes in the TWAMP-Control and TWAMP-Test protocols simultaneously. The memo also describes a new IANA registry for additional features, called the TWAMP Modes registry. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5617 - DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) Author Domain Signing Practices (ADSP)
DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) defines a domain-level authentication framework for email to permit verification of the source and contents of messages. This document specifies an adjunct mechanism to aid in assessing messages that do not contain a DKIM signature for the domain used in the author's address. It defines a record that can advertise whether a domain signs its outgoing mail as well as how other hosts can access that record. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5616 - Streaming Internet Messaging Attachments
This document describes a method for streaming multimedia attachments received by a resource- and/or network-constrained device from an IMAP server. It allows such clients, which often have limits in storage space and bandwidth, to play video and audio email content.
RFC5615 - H.248/MEGACO Registration Procedures
This document updates the H.248/MEGACO IANA Package registration procedures in order to better describe the Package registration process and to provide a more formal review and feedback process. This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC5614 - Mobile Ad Hoc Network (MANET) Extension of OSPF Using Connected Dominating Set (CDS) Flooding
This document specifies an extension of OSPFv3 to support mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs). The extension, called OSPF-MDR, is designed as a new OSPF interface type for MANETs. OSPF-MDR is based on the selection of a subset of MANET routers, consisting of MANET Designated Routers (MDRs) and Backup MDRs. The MDRs form a connected dominating set (CDS), and the MDRs and Backup MDRs together form a biconnected CDS for robustness. This CDS is exploited in two ways. First, to reduce flooding overhead, an optimized flooding procedure is used in which only (Backup) MDRs flood new link state advertisements (LSAs) back out the receiving interface; reliable flooding is ensured by retransmitting LSAs along adjacencies. Second, adjacencies are formed only between (Backup) MDRs and a subset of their neighbors, allowing for much better scaling in dense networks. The CDS is constructed using 2-hop neighbor information provided in a Hello protocol extension. The Hello protocol is further optimized by allowing differential Hellos that report only changes in neighbor states. Options are specified for originating router-LSAs that provide full or partial topology information, allowing overhead to be reduced by advertising less topology information. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC5613 - OSPF Link-Local Signaling
OSPF is a link-state intra-domain routing protocol. OSPF routers exchange information on a link using packets that follow a well-defined fixed format. The format is not flexible enough to enable new features that need to exchange arbitrary data. This document describes a backward-compatible technique to perform link-local signaling, i.e., exchange arbitrary data on a link. This document replaces the experimental specification published in RFC 4813 to bring it on the Standards Track.
RFC5612 - Enterprise Number for Documentation Use
This document describes an Enterprise Number (also known as SMI Network Management Private Enterprise Code) for use in documentation. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5611 - Layer Two Tunneling Protocol version 3 - Setup of Time-Division Multiplexing (TDM) Pseudowires
This document defines extensions to the Layer Two Tunneling Protocol version 3 (L2TPv3) for support of structure-agnostic and structure-aware (Circuit Emulation Service over Packet Switched Network (CESoPSN) style) Time-Division Multiplexing (TDM) pseudowires. Support of structure-aware (Time-Division Multiplexing over IP (TDMoIP) style) pseudowires over L2TPv3 is left for further study. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5610 - Exporting Type Information for IP Flow Information Export (IPFIX) Information Elements
This document describes an extension to the IP Flow Information Export (IPFIX) protocol, which is used to represent and transmit data from IP flow measurement devices for collection, storage, and analysis, to allow the encoding of IPFIX Information Model properties within an IPFIX Message stream. This enables the export of extended type information for enterprise-specific Information Elements and the storage of such information within IPFIX Files, facilitating interoperability and reusability among a wide variety of applications and tools. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5609 - State Machines for the Protocol for Carrying Authentication for Network Access (PANA)
This document defines the conceptual state machines for the Protocol for Carrying Authentication for Network Access (PANA). The state machines consist of the PANA Client (PaC) state machine and the PANA Authentication Agent (PAA) state machine. The two state machines show how PANA can interface with the Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) state machines. The state machines and associated models are informative only. Implementations may achieve the same results using different methods. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5608 - Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) Usage for Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) Transport Models
This memo describes the use of a Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) authentication and authorization service with Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) secure Transport Models to authenticate users and authorize creation of secure transport sessions. While the recommendations of this memo are generally applicable to a broad class of SNMP Transport Models, the examples focus on the Secure Shell (SSH) Transport Model. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5607 - Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) Authorization for Network Access Server (NAS) Management
This document specifies Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) attributes for authorizing management access to a Network Access Server (NAS). Both local and remote management are supported, with granular access rights and management privileges. Specific provisions are made for remote management via Framed Management protocols and for management access over a secure transport protocol. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5606 - Implications of 'retransmission-allowed' for SIP Location Conveyance
This document explores an ambiguity in the interpretation of the <retransmission-allowed> element of the Presence Information Data Format for Location Objects (PIDF-LO) in cases where PIDF-LO is conveyed by the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP). It provides recommendations for how the SIP location conveyance mechanism should adapt to this ambiguity.
RFC5605 - Managed Objects for ATM over Packet Switched Networks (PSNs)
This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB) for use with network management protocols in the Internet community. In particular, it describes managed objects for modeling ATM Pseudowire (PW) carrying ATM cells over Packet Switched Networks (PSNs). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5604 - Managed Objects for Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) over Packet Switched Networks (PSNs)
This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB) for use with network management protocols in the Internet community. In particular, it describes managed objects for pseudowire encapsulation for structured or unstructured Time-Division Multiplexing (TDM) (T1, E1, T3, E3) circuits over a Packet Switched Network (PSN). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5603 - Ethernet Pseudowire (PW) Management Information Base (MIB)
This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB) for use with network management protocols in the Internet community. In particular, it describes managed objects for modeling of Ethernet pseudowire (PW) services. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5602 - Pseudowire (PW) over MPLS PSN Management Information Base (MIB)
This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB) for use with network management protocols in the Internet community. In particular, it describes a MIB module for PW operation over Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Label Switching Routers (LSRs). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5601 - Pseudowire (PW) Management Information Base (MIB)
This memo defines a Standards Track portion of the Management Information Base for use with network management protocols in the Internet community. In particular, it describes managed objects for modeling of Pseudowire Edge-to-Edge services carried over a general Packet Switched Network. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5598 - Internet Mail Architecture
Over its thirty-five-year history, Internet Mail has changed significantly in scale and complexity, as it has become a global infrastructure service. These changes have been evolutionary, rather than revolutionary, reflecting a strong desire to preserve both its installed base and its usefulness. To collaborate productively on this large and complex system, all participants need to work from a common view of it and use a common language to describe its components and the interactions among them. But the many differences in perspective currently make it difficult to know exactly what another participant means. To serve as the necessary common frame of reference, this document describes the enhanced Internet Mail architecture, reflecting the current service. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5597 - Network Address Translation (NAT) Behavioral Requirements for the Datagram Congestion Control Protocol
This document defines a set of requirements for NATs handling the Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP). These requirements allow DCCP applications, such as streaming applications, to operate consistently, and they are very similar to the TCP requirements for NATs, which have already been published by the IETF. Ensuring that NATs meet this set of requirements will greatly increase the likelihood that applications using DCCP will function properly. This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC5596 - Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP) Simultaneous-Open Technique to Facilitate NAT/Middlebox Traversal
This document specifies an update to the Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP), a connection-oriented and datagram-based transport protocol. The update adds support for the DCCP-Listen packet. This assists DCCP applications to communicate through middleboxes (e.g., a Network Address Port Translator or a DCCP server behind a firewall), where peering endpoints need to initiate communication in a near- simultaneous manner to establish necessary middlebox state. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5595 - The Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP) Service Codes
This document describes the usage of Service Codes by the Datagram Congestion Control Protocol, RFC 4340. It motivates the setting of a Service Code by applications. Service Codes provide a method to identify the intended service/application to process a DCCP connection request. This provides improved flexibility in the use and assignment of port numbers for connection multiplexing. The use of a DCCP Service Code can also enable more explicit coordination of services with middleboxes (e.g., network address translators and firewalls). This document updates the specification provided in RFC 4340. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5594 - Report from the IETF Workshop on Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Infrastructure, May 28, 2008
This document reports the outcome of a workshop organized by the Real-time Applications and Infrastructure Area Directors of the IETF to discuss network delay and congestion issues resulting from increased Peer-to-Peer (P2P) traffic volumes. The workshop was held on May 28, 2008 at MIT in Cambridge, MA, USA. The goals of the workshop were twofold: to understand the technical problems that ISPs and end users are experiencing as a result of high volumes of P2P traffic, and to begin to understand how the IETF may be helpful in addressing these problems. Gaining an understanding of where in the IETF this work might be pursued and how to extract feasible work items were highlighted as important tasks in pursuit of the latter goal. The workshop was very well attended and produced several work items that have since been taken up by members of the IETF community. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC5593 - Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP) - URL Access Identifier Extension
The existing IMAP URL specification (RFC 5092) lists several <access> identifiers and <access> identifier prefixes that can be used to restrict access to URLAUTH-generated URLs. However, these identifiers do not provide facilities for new services such as streaming. This document proposes a set of new <access> identifiers as well as an IANA mechanism to register new <access> identifiers for future applications.
RFC5592 - Secure Shell Transport Model for the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
This memo describes a Transport Model for the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), using the Secure Shell (SSH) protocol.
RFC5591 - Transport Security Model for the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
This memo describes a Transport Security Model for the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP).
RFC5590 - Transport Subsystem for the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
This document defines a Transport Subsystem, extending the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) architecture defined in RFC 3411. This document defines a subsystem to contain Transport Models that is comparable to other subsystems in the RFC 3411 architecture. As work is being done to expand the transports to include secure transports, such as the Secure Shell (SSH) Protocol and Transport Layer Security (TLS), using a subsystem will enable consistent design and modularity of such Transport Models. This document identifies and describes some key aspects that need to be considered for any Transport Model for SNMP. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC5589 - Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) Call Control - Transfer
This document describes providing Call Transfer capabilities in the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP). SIP extensions such as REFER and Replaces are used to provide a number of transfer services including blind transfer, consultative transfer, and attended transfer. This work is part of the SIP multiparty call control framework. This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC5588 - Generic Security Service Application Program Interface (GSS-API) Extension for Storing Delegated Credentials
This document defines a new function for the Generic Security Service Application Program Interface (GSS-API), which allows applications to store delegated (and other) credentials in the implicit GSS-API credential store. This is needed for GSS-API applications to use delegated credentials as they would use other credentials. [STANDARDS-TRACK]