RFC Abstracts

RFC7183 - Integrity Protection for the Neighborhood Discovery Protocol (NHDP) and Optimized Link State Routing Protocol Version 2 (OLSRv2)
This document specifies integrity and replay protection for the Mobile Ad Hoc Network (MANET) Neighborhood Discovery Protocol (NHDP) and the Optimized Link State Routing Protocol version 2 (OLSRv2). This protection is achieved by using an HMAC-SHA-256 Integrity Check Value (ICV) TLV and a Timestamp TLV based on Portable Operating System Interface (POSIX) time.
RFC7182 - Integrity Check Value and Timestamp TLV Definitions for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANETs)
This document revises, extends, and replaces RFC 6622. It describes general and flexible TLVs for representing cryptographic Integrity Check Values (ICVs) and timestamps, using the generalized Mobile Ad Hoc Network (MANET) packet/message format defined in RFC 5444. It defines two Packet TLVs, two Message TLVs, and two Address Block TLVs for affixing ICVs and timestamps to a packet, a message, and one or more addresses, respectively.
RFC7181 - The Optimized Link State Routing Protocol Version 2
This specification describes version 2 of the Optimized Link State Routing Protocol (OLSRv2) for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANETs).
RFC7180 - Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL): Clarifications, Corrections, and Updates
The IETF Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) protocol provides least-cost pair-wise data forwarding without configuration in multi-hop networks with arbitrary topology and link technology, safe forwarding even during periods of temporary loops, and support for multipathing of both unicast and multicast traffic. TRILL accomplishes this by using Intermediate System to Intermediate System (IS-IS) link-state routing and by encapsulating traffic using a header that includes a hop count. Since publication of the TRILL base protocol in July 2011, active development of TRILL has revealed errata in RFC 6325 and some cases that could use clarifications or updates.
RFC7179 - Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL): Header Extension
The IETF Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) base protocol (RFC 6325) specifies minimal hooks to safely support TRILL Header extensions. This document specifies an initial extension providing additional flag bits and specifies some of those bits. It updates RFC 6325.
RFC7178 - Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL): RBridge Channel Support
This document specifies a general channel mechanism for sending messages, such as Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) messages, between Routing Bridges (RBridges) and between RBridges and end stations in an RBridge campus through extensions to the Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) protocol.
RFC7177 - Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL): Adjacency
The IETF Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) protocol supports arbitrary link technologies between TRILL switches, including point-to-point links and multi-access Local Area Network (LAN) links that can have multiple TRILL switches and end stations attached. TRILL uses Intermediate System to Intermediate System (IS-IS) routing. This document specifies the establishment, reporting, and termination of IS-IS adjacencies between TRILL switches, also known as RBridges (Routing Bridges). It also concerns four other link-local aspects of TRILL: Designated RBridge (DRB) selection, MTU (Maximum Transmission Unit) testing, pseudonode creation, and BFD (Bidirectional Forwarding Detection) session bootstrapping in connection with adjacency. State diagrams are included where appropriate. This document obsoletes RFC 6327 and updates RFC 6325.
RFC7176 - Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) Use of IS-IS
The IETF Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) protocol provides optimal pair-wise data frame forwarding without configuration in multi-hop networks with arbitrary topology and link technology; it also provides support for multipathing of both unicast and multicast traffic. This document specifies the data formats and code points for the IS-IS extensions to support TRILL. These data formats and code points may also be used by technologies other than TRILL. This document obsoletes RFC 6326.
RFC7175 - Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL): Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) Support
This document specifies use of the Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) protocol in Routing Bridge (RBridge) campuses based on the RBridge Channel extension to the Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) protocol.
RFC7174 - Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) Framework
This document specifies a reference framework for Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) in Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) networks. The focus of the document is on the fault and performance management aspects of TRILL OAM.
RFC7173 - Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) Transport Using Pseudowires
This document specifies how to interconnect a pair of Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) switch ports using pseudowires under existing TRILL and Pseudowire Emulation End-to-End (PWE3) standards.
RFC7172 - Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL): Fine-Grained Labeling
The IETF has standardized Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL), a protocol for least-cost transparent frame routing in multi-hop networks with arbitrary topologies and link technologies, using link-state routing and a hop count. The TRILL base protocol standard supports the labeling of TRILL Data packets with up to 4K IDs. However, there are applications that require a larger number of labels providing configurable isolation of data. This document updates RFC 6325 by specifying optional extensions to the TRILL base protocol to safely accomplish this. These extensions, called fine-grained labeling, are primarily intended for use in large data centers, that is, those with more than 4K users requiring configurable data isolation from each other.
RFC7171 - PT-EAP: Posture Transport (PT) Protocol for Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) Tunnel Methods
This document specifies PT-EAP, a Posture Transport (PT) protocol based on the Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) and designed to be used only inside an EAP tunnel method protected by Transport Layer Security (TLS). The document also describes the intended applicability of PT-EAP.
RFC7170 - Tunnel Extensible Authentication Protocol (TEAP) Version 1
This document defines the Tunnel Extensible Authentication Protocol (TEAP) version 1. TEAP is a tunnel-based EAP method that enables secure communication between a peer and a server by using the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol to establish a mutually authenticated tunnel. Within the tunnel, TLV objects are used to convey authentication-related data between the EAP peer and the EAP server.
RFC7169 - The NSA (No Secrecy Afforded) Certificate Extension
This document defines the NSA (No Secrecy Afforded) certificate extension appropriate for use in certain PKIX (X.509 Pubic Key Certificates) digital certificates. Historically, clients and servers strived to maintain the privacy of their keys; however, the secrecy of their private keys cannot always be maintained. In certain circumstances, a client or a server might feel that they will be compelled in the future to share their keys with a third party. Some clients and servers also have been compelled to share their keys and wish to indicate to relying parties upon certificate renewal that their keys have in fact been shared with a third party.
RFC7168 - The Hyper Text Coffee Pot Control Protocol for Tea Efflux Appliances (HTCPCP-TEA)
The Hyper Text Coffee Pot Control Protocol (HTCPCP) specification does not allow for the brewing of tea, in all its variety and complexity. This paper outlines an extension to HTCPCP to allow for pots to provide networked tea-brewing facilities.
RFC7167 - A Framework for Point-to-Multipoint MPLS in Transport Networks
The Multiprotocol Label Switching Transport Profile (MPLS-TP) is the common set of MPLS protocol functions defined to enable the construction and operation of packet transport networks. The MPLS-TP supports both point-to-point and point-to-multipoint transport paths. This document defines the elements and functions of the MPLS-TP architecture that are applicable specifically to supporting point-to-multipoint transport paths.
RFC7166 - Supporting Authentication Trailer for OSPFv3
Currently, OSPF for IPv6 (OSPFv3) uses IPsec as the only mechanism for authenticating protocol packets. This behavior is different from authentication mechanisms present in other routing protocols (OSPFv2, Intermediate System to Intermediate System (IS-IS), RIP, and Routing Information Protocol Next Generation (RIPng)). In some environments, it has been found that IPsec is difficult to configure and maintain and thus cannot be used. This document defines an alternative mechanism to authenticate OSPFv3 protocol packets so that OSPFv3 does not depend only upon IPsec for authentication.
RFC7165 - Use Cases and Requirements for JSON Object Signing and Encryption (JOSE)
Many Internet applications have a need for object-based security mechanisms in addition to security mechanisms at the network layer or transport layer. For many years, the Cryptographic Message Syntax (CMS) has provided a binary secure object format based on ASN.1. Over time, binary object encodings such as ASN.1 have become less common than text-based encodings, such as the JavaScript Object Notation (JSON). This document defines a set of use cases and requirements for a secure object format encoded using JSON, drawn from a variety of application security mechanisms currently in development.
RFC7164 - RTP and Leap Seconds
This document discusses issues that arise when RTP sessions span Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) leap seconds. It updates RFC 3550 by describing how RTP senders and receivers should behave in the presence of leap seconds.
RFC7163 - URN for Country-Specific Emergency Services
This document updates the registration guidance provided in Section 4.2 of RFC 5031, which allows the registration of service URNs with the 'sos' service type only for emergency services "that are offered widely and in different countries". This document updates those instructions to allow such registrations when, at the time of registration, those services are offered in only one country.
RFC7162 - IMAP Extensions: Quick Flag Changes Resynchronization (CONDSTORE) and Quick Mailbox Resynchronization (QRESYNC)
Often, multiple IMAP (RFC 3501) clients need to coordinate changes to a common IMAP mailbox. Examples include different clients working on behalf of the same user and multiple users accessing shared mailboxes. These clients need a mechanism to efficiently synchronize state changes for messages within the mailbox.
RFC7161 - Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIPv6) Multicast Handover Optimization by the Subscription Information Acquisition through the LMA (SIAL)
This document specifies an experimental multicast handover optimization mechanism for Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIPv6) to accelerate the delivery of multicast traffic to mobile nodes after handovers. The mechanism, called Subscription Information Acquisition through the LMA (SIAL), is based on speeding up the acquisition of mobile nodes' multicast context by the mobile access gateways. To do that, extensions to the current PMIPv6 protocol are proposed. These extensions are not only applicable to the base solution for multicast support in Proxy Mobile IPv6, but they can also be applied to other solutions developed to avoid the tunnel convergence problem. Furthermore, these extensions are also independent of the role played by the mobile access gateway within the multicast network (acting as either multicast listener discovery proxy or multicast router).
RFC7160 - Support for Multiple Clock Rates in an RTP Session
This document clarifies the RTP specification regarding the use of different clock rates in an RTP session. It also provides guidance on how legacy RTP implementations that use multiple clock rates can interoperate with RTP implementations that use the algorithm described in this document. It updates RFC 3550.
RFC7159 - The JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) Data Interchange Format
JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) is a lightweight, text-based, language-independent data interchange format. It was derived from the ECMAScript Programming Language Standard. JSON defines a small set of formatting rules for the portable representation of structured data.
RFC7158 - The JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) Data Interchange Format
JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) is a lightweight, text-based, language-independent data interchange format. It was derived from the ECMAScript Programming Language Standard. JSON defines a small set of formatting rules for the portable representation of structured data.
RFC7157 - IPv6 Multihoming without Network Address Translation
Network Address and Port Translation (NAPT) works well for conserving global addresses and addressing multihoming requirements because an IPv4 NAPT router implements three functions: source address selection, next-hop resolution, and (optionally) DNS resolution. For IPv6 hosts, one approach could be the use of IPv6-to-IPv6 Network Prefix Translation (NPTv6). However, NAT and NPTv6 should be avoided, if at all possible, to permit transparent end-to-end connectivity. In this document, we analyze the use cases of multihoming. We also describe functional requirements and possible solutions for multihoming without the use of NAT in IPv6 for hosts and small IPv6 networks that would otherwise be unable to meet minimum IPv6-allocation criteria. We conclude that DHCPv6-based solutions are suitable to solve the multihoming issues described in this document, but NPTv6 may be required as an intermediate solution.
RFC7156 - Diameter Support for Proxy Mobile IPv6 Localized Routing
In Proxy Mobile IPv6, packets received from a Mobile Node (MN) by the Mobile Access Gateway (MAG) to which it is attached are typically tunneled to a Local Mobility Anchor (LMA) for routing. The term "localized routing" refers to a method by which packets are routed directly between an MN's MAG and the MAG of its Correspondent Node (CN) without involving any LMA. In a Proxy Mobile IPv6 deployment, it may be desirable to control the establishment of localized routing sessions between two MAGs in a Proxy Mobile IPv6 domain by requiring that the session be authorized. This document specifies how to accomplish this using the Diameter protocol.
RFC7155 - Diameter Network Access Server Application
This document describes the Diameter protocol application used for Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting services in the Network Access Server (NAS) environment; it obsoletes RFC 4005. When combined with the Diameter Base protocol, Transport Profile, and Extensible Authentication Protocol specifications, this application specification satisfies typical network access services requirements.
RFC7154 - IETF Guidelines for Conduct
This document provides a set of guidelines for personal interaction in the Internet Engineering Task Force. The guidelines recognize the diversity of IETF participants, emphasize the value of mutual respect, and stress the broad applicability of our work.
RFC7153 - IANA Registries for BGP Extended Communities
This document reorganizes the IANA registries for the type values and sub-type values of the BGP Extended Communities attribute and the BGP IPv6-Address-Specific Extended Communities attribute. This is done in order to remove interdependencies among the registries, thus making it easier for IANA to determine which codepoints are available for assignment in which registries. This document also clarifies the information that must be provided to IANA when requesting an allocation from one or more of these registries. These changes are compatible with the existing allocations and thus do not affect protocol implementations. The changes will, however, impact the "IANA Considerations" sections of future protocol specifications. This document updates RFC 4360 and RFC 5701.
RFC7152 - Requirements for Metro Ethernet Forum (MEF) Ethernet-Tree (E-Tree) Support in Layer 2 Virtual Private Network (L2VPN)
This document provides functional requirements for the support of Metro Ethernet Forum (MEF) Ethernet Tree (E-Tree) in multipoint Layer 2 Virtual Private Network solutions (referred to as simply "L2VPN"). It is intended that potential solutions will use these requirements as guidelines.
RFC7151 - File Transfer Protocol HOST Command for Virtual Hosts
The File Transfer Protocol, as defined in RFC 959, does not provide a way for FTP clients and servers to differentiate between multiple DNS names that are registered for a single IP address. This document defines a new FTP command that provides a mechanism for FTP clients and servers to identify individual virtual hosts on an FTP server.
RFC7150 - Conveying Vendor-Specific Constraints in the Path Computation Element Communication Protocol
The Path Computation Element Communication Protocol (PCEP) is used to convey path computation requests and responses both between Path Computation Clients (PCCs) and Path Computation Elements (PCEs) and between cooperating PCEs. In PCEP, the path computation requests carry details of the constraints and objective functions that the PCC wishes the PCE to apply in its computation.
RFC7149 - Software-Defined Networking: A Perspective from within a Service Provider Environment
Software-Defined Networking (SDN) has been one of the major buzz words of the networking industry for the past couple of years. And yet, no clear definition of what SDN actually covers has been broadly admitted so far. This document aims to clarify the SDN landscape by providing a perspective on requirements, issues, and other considerations about SDN, as seen from within a service provider environment.
RFC7148 - Prefix Delegation Support for Proxy Mobile IPv6
This specification defines extensions to the Proxy Mobile IPv6 protocol for allowing a mobile router in a Proxy Mobile IPv6 domain to obtain IP prefixes for its attached mobile networks using DHCPv6 prefix delegation. Network-based mobility management support is provided for those delegated IP prefixes just as it is provided for the mobile node's home address. Even if the mobile router performs a handoff and changes its network point of attachment, mobility support is ensured for all the delegated IP prefixes and for all the IP nodes in the mobile network that use IP address configuration from those delegated IP prefixes.
RFC7147 - Definitions of Managed Objects for the Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI)
This document defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB) for use with network management protocols. In particular, it defines objects for managing a client using the Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) protocol (SCSI over TCP).
RFC7146 - Securing Block Storage Protocols over IP: RFC 3723 Requirements Update for IPsec v3
RFC 3723 specifies IPsec requirements for block storage protocols over IP (e.g., Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI)) based on IPsec v2 (RFC 2401 and related RFCs); those requirements have subsequently been applied to remote direct data placement protocols, e.g., the Remote Direct Memory Access Protocol (RDMAP). This document updates RFC 3723's IPsec requirements to IPsec v3 (RFC 4301 and related RFCs) and makes some changes to required algorithms based on developments in cryptography since RFC 3723 was published.
RFC7145 - Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) Extensions for the Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) Specification
Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) Extensions for Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) provides the RDMA data transfer capability to iSCSI by layering iSCSI on top of an RDMA-Capable Protocol. An RDMA-Capable Protocol provides RDMA Read and Write services, which enable data to be transferred directly into SCSI I/O Buffers without intermediate data copies. This document describes the extensions to the iSCSI protocol to support RDMA services as provided by an RDMA-Capable Protocol.
RFC7144 - Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) SCSI Features Update
Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) is a SCSI transport protocol that maps the SCSI family of protocols onto TCP/IP. The iSCSI protocol as specified in RFC 7143 (and as previously specified by the combination of RFC 3720 and RFC 5048) is based on the SAM-2 (SCSI Architecture Model - 2) version of the SCSI family of protocols. This document defines enhancements to the iSCSI protocol to support certain additional features of the SCSI protocol that were defined in SAM-3, SAM-4, and SAM-5.
RFC7143 - Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) Protocol (Consolidated)
This document describes a transport protocol for SCSI that works on top of TCP. The iSCSI protocol aims to be fully compliant with the standardized SCSI Architecture Model (SAM-2). RFC 3720 defined the original iSCSI protocol. RFC 3721 discusses iSCSI naming examples and discovery techniques. Subsequently, RFC 3980 added an additional naming format to the iSCSI protocol. RFC 4850 followed up by adding a new public extension key to iSCSI. RFC 5048 offered a number of clarifications as well as a few improvements and corrections to the original iSCSI protocol.
RFC7142 - Reclassification of RFC 1142 to Historic
This memo reclassifies RFC 1142, "OSI IS-IS Intra-domain Routing Protocol", to Historic status. This memo also obsoletes RFC 1142.
RFC7141 - Byte and Packet Congestion Notification
This document provides recommendations of best current practice for dropping or marking packets using any active queue management (AQM) algorithm, including Random Early Detection (RED), BLUE, Pre- Congestion Notification (PCN), and newer schemes such as CoDel (Controlled Delay) and PIE (Proportional Integral controller Enhanced). We give three strong recommendations: (1) packet size should be taken into account when transports detect and respond to congestion indications, (2) packet size should not be taken into account when network equipment creates congestion signals (marking, dropping), and therefore (3) in the specific case of RED, the byte- mode packet drop variant that drops fewer small packets should not be used. This memo updates RFC 2309 to deprecate deliberate preferential treatment of small packets in AQM algorithms.
RFC7140 - LDP Extensions for Hub and Spoke Multipoint Label Switched Path
This document introduces a hub and spoke multipoint (HSMP) Label Switched Path (LSP), which allows traffic from root to leaf through point-to-multipoint (P2MP) LSPs and also leaf to root along the reverse path. That means traffic entering the HSMP LSP from the application/customer at the root node travels downstream to each leaf node, exactly as if it were traveling downstream along a P2MP LSP to each leaf node. Upstream traffic entering the HSMP LSP at any leaf node travels upstream along the tree to the root, as if it were unicast to the root. Direct communication among the leaf nodes is not allowed.
RFC7139 - GMPLS Signaling Extensions for Control of Evolving G.709 Optical Transport Networks
ITU-T Recommendation G.709 [G709-2012] introduced new Optical channel Data Unit (ODU) containers (ODU0, ODU4, ODU2e, and ODUflex) and enhanced Optical Transport Network (OTN) flexibility.
RFC7138 - Traffic Engineering Extensions to OSPF for GMPLS Control of Evolving G.709 Optical Transport Networks
This document describes Open Shortest Path First - Traffic Engineering (OSPF-TE) routing protocol extensions to support GMPLS control of Optical Transport Networks (OTNs) specified in ITU-T Recommendation G.709 as published in 2012. It extends mechanisms defined in RFC 4203.
RFC7137 - Use of the OSPF-MANET Interface in Single-Hop Broadcast Networks
This document describes the use of the OSPF-MANET interface in single-hop broadcast networks. It includes a mechanism to dynamically determine the presence of such a network and specific operational considerations due to its nature.
RFC7136 - Significance of IPv6 Interface Identifiers
The IPv6 addressing architecture includes a unicast interface identifier that is used in the creation of many IPv6 addresses. Interface identifiers are formed by a variety of methods. This document clarifies that the bits in an interface identifier have no meaning and that the entire identifier should be treated as an opaque value. In particular, RFC 4291 defines a method by which the Universal and Group bits of an IEEE link-layer address are mapped into an IPv6 unicast interface identifier. This document clarifies that those two bits are significant only in the process of deriving interface identifiers from an IEEE link-layer address, and it updates RFC 4291 accordingly.
RFC7135 - Registering a SIP Resource Priority Header Field Namespace for Local Emergency Communications
This document creates the new Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) Resource Priority header field namespace 'esnet' and registers this namespace with IANA. The new header field namespace allows for local emergency session establishment to a public safety answering point (PSAP), between PSAPs, and between a PSAP and first responders and their organizations.
RFC7134 - The Management Policy of the Resource Priority Header (RPH) Registry Changed to "IETF Review"
RFC 4412 defines the "Resource-Priority Namespaces" and "Resource-Priority Priority-values" registries. The management policy of these registries is "Standards Action". This document normatively updates RFC 4412 to change the management policy of these registries to "IETF Review".