RFC Abstracts

RFC4916 - Connected Identity in the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)
This document provides a means for a Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) User Agent (UA) that receives a dialog-forming request to supply its identity to the peer UA by means of a request in the reverse direction, and for that identity to be signed by an Authentication Service. Because of retargeting of a dialog-forming request (changing the value of the Request-URI), the UA that receives it (the User Agent Server, UAS) can have a different identity from that in the To header field. The same mechanism can be used to indicate a change of identity during a dialog, e.g., because of some action in the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) behind a gateway. This document normatively updates RFC 3261 (SIP). [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4915 - Multi-Topology (MT) Routing in OSPF
This document describes an extension to Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) in order to define independent IP topologies called Multi- Topologies (MTs). The Multi-Topologies extension can be used for computing different paths for unicast traffic, multicast traffic, different classes of service based on flexible criteria, or an in- band network management topology.
RFC4914 - Abstract Syntax Notation X (ASN.X) Representation of Encoding Instructions for the XML Encoding Rules (XER)
Abstract Syntax Notation X (ASN.X) is an Extensible Markup Language (XML) representation for Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1) specifications. This document specifies the ASN.X representation of encoding instructions for the XML Encoding Rules (XER). This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC4913 - Abstract Syntax Notation X (ASN.X) Representation of Encoding Instructions for the Generic String Encoding Rules (GSER)
Abstract Syntax Notation X (ASN.X) is an Extensible Markup Language (XML) representation for Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1) specifications. This document specifies the ASN.X representation of encoding instructions for the Generic String Encoding Rules (GSER). This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC4912 - Abstract Syntax Notation X (ASN.X)
Abstract Syntax Notation X (ASN.X) is a semantically equivalent Extensible Markup Language (XML) representation for Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1) specifications. ASN.X completely avoids the numerous ambiguities inherent in the ASN.1 language; therefore, specifications written in ASN.X are much easier to parse and manage than original ASN.1 specifications. ASN.X, together with the Robust XML Encoding Rules (RXER), constitutes a schema language for XML documents that offers, through other ASN.1 encoding rules, alternative compact binary encodings for XML instance documents. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC4911 - Encoding Instructions for the Robust XML Encoding Rules (RXER)
This document defines encoding instructions that may be used in an Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1) specification to alter how ASN.1 values are encoded by the Robust XML Encoding Rules (RXER) and Canonical Robust XML Encoding Rules (CRXER), for example, to encode a component of an ASN.1 value as an Extensible Markup Language (XML) attribute rather than as a child element. Some of these encoding instructions also affect how an ASN.1 specification is translated into an Abstract Syntax Notation X (ASN.X) specification. Encoding instructions that allow an ASN.1 specification to reference definitions in other XML schema languages are also defined. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC4910 - Robust XML Encoding Rules (RXER) for Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1)
This document defines a set of Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1) encoding rules, called the Robust XML Encoding Rules or RXER, that produce an Extensible Markup Language (XML) representation for values of any given ASN.1 data type. Rules for producing a canonical RXER encoding are also defined. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC4909 - Multimedia Internet KEYing (MIKEY) General Extension Payload for Open Mobile Alliance BCAST LTKM/STKM Transport
This document specifies a new Multimedia Internet KEYing (MIKEY) General Extension payload (RFC 3830) to transport the short-term key message (STKM) and long-term key message (LTKM) payloads defined in the Open Mobile Alliance's (OMA) Browser and Content (BAC) Broadcast (BCAST) group's Service and Content protection specification. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4908 - Multi-homing for small scale fixed network Using Mobile IP and NEMO
Multihoming technology improves the availability of host and network connectivity. Since the behaviors of fixed and mobile networks differ, distinct architectures for each have been discussed and proposed. This document proposes a common architecture for both mobile and fixed networking environments, using mobile IP (RFC 3775) and Network Mobility (NEMO; RFC 3963). The proposed architecture requires a modification of mobile IP and NEMO so that multiple Care-of Addresses (CoAs) can be used. In addition, multiple Home Agents (HAs) that are located in different places are required for redundancy. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC4907 - Architectural Implications of Link Indications
A link indication represents information provided by the link layer to higher layers regarding the state of the link. This document describes the role of link indications within the Internet architecture. While the judicious use of link indications can provide performance benefits, inappropriate use can degrade both robustness and performance. This document summarizes current proposals, describes the architectural issues, and provides examples of appropriate and inappropriate uses of link indications. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4906 - Transport of Layer 2 Frames Over MPLS
This document describes methods for transporting the Protocol Data Units (PDUs) of layer 2 protocols such as Frame Relay, Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Adaption Layer 5 (AAL5), and Ethernet, and for providing a Synchronized Optical Network (SONET) circuit emulation service across an MPLS network. This document describes the so-called "draft-martini" protocol, which has since been superseded by the Pseudowire Emulation Edge to Edge Working Group specifications described in RFC 4447 and related documents. This memo defines a Historic Document for the Internet community.
RFC4905 - Encapsulation Methods for Transport of Layer 2 Frames over MPLS Networks
This document describes methods for encapsulating the Protocol Data Units (PDUs) of layer 2 protocols such as Frame Relay, Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), or Ethernet for transport across an MPLS network. This document describes the so-called "draft-martini" protocol, which has since been superseded by the Pseudowire Emulation Edge to Edge Working Group specifications described in RFC 4447 and related documents. This memo defines a Historic Document for the Internet community.
RFC4904 - Representing Trunk Groups in tel/sip Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs)
This document describes a standardized mechanism to convey trunk group parameters in sip and tel Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs). An extension to the tel URI is defined for this purpose. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4903 - Multi-Link Subnet Issues
There have been several proposals around the notion that a subnet may span multiple links connected by routers. This memo documents the issues and potential problems that have been raised with such an approach. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4902 - Integrity, Privacy, and Security in Open Pluggable Edge Services (OPES) for SMTP
The Open Pluggable Edge Services (OPES) framework is application agnostic. Application-specific adaptations extend that framework. Previous work has focused on HTTP and work for SMTP is in progress. These protocols differ fundamentally in the way data flows, and it turns out that existing OPES requirements and IAB considerations for OPES need to be reviewed with regards to how well they fit for SMTP adaptation. This document analyzes aspects about the integrity of SMTP and mail message adaptation by OPES systems and about privacy and security issues when the OPES framework is adapted to SMTP. It also lists requirements that must be considered when creating the "SMTP adaptation with OPES" document.
RFC4901 - Protocol Extensions for Header Compression over MPLS
This specification defines how to use Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) to route Header-Compressed (HC) packets over an MPLS label switched path. HC can significantly reduce packet-header overhead and, in combination with MPLS, can also increases bandwidth efficiency and processing scalability in terms of the maximum number of simultaneous compressed flows that use HC at each router). Here we define how MPLS pseudowires are used to transport the HC context and control messages between the ingress and egress MPLS label switching routers. This is defined for a specific set of existing HC mechanisms that might be used, for example, to support voice over IP. This specification also describes extension mechanisms to allow support for future, as yet to be defined, HC protocols. In this specification, each HC protocol operates independently over a single pseudowire instance, very much as it would over a single point-to-point link. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4898 - TCP Extended Statistics MIB
This document describes extended performance statistics for TCP. They are designed to use TCP's ideal vantage point to diagnose performance problems in both the network and the application. If a network-based application is performing poorly, TCP can determine if the bottleneck is in the sender, the receiver, or the network itself. If the bottleneck is in the network, TCP can provide specific information about its nature. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4897 - Handling Normative References to Standards-Track Documents
The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and Request for Comments (RFC) Editor have a long-standing rule that a document at a given maturity level cannot be published until all of the documents that it references as normative are at that maturity level or higher. This rule has sometimes resulted in very long publication delays for documents and some claims that it was a major obstruction to advancing documents in maturity level. The IETF agreed on a way to bypass this rule with RFC 3967. This document describes a simpler procedure for downward references to Standards-Track and Best Current Practice (BCP) documents, namely "note and move on". The procedure in RFC 3967 still applies for downward references to other classes of documents. In both cases, annotations should be added to such References. This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC4896 - Signaling Compression (SigComp) Corrections and Clarifications
This document describes common misinterpretations and some ambiguities in the Signaling Compression Protocol (SigComp), and offers guidance to developers to resolve any resultant problems. SigComp defines a scheme for compressing messages generated by application protocols such as the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP). This document updates the following RFCs: RFC 3320, RFC 3321, and RFC 3485. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4895 - Authenticated Chunks for the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP)
This document describes a new chunk type, several parameters, and procedures for the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP). This new chunk type can be used to authenticate SCTP chunks by using shared keys between the sender and receiver. The new parameters are used to establish the shared keys. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4894 - Use of Hash Algorithms in Internet Key Exchange (IKE) and IPsec
This document describes how the IKEv1 (Internet Key Exchange version 1), IKEv2, and IPsec protocols use hash functions, and explains the level of vulnerability of these protocols to the reduced collision resistance of the MD5 and SHA-1 hash algorithms. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4893 - BGP Support for Four-octet AS Number Space
Currently the Autonomous System (AS) number is encoded as a two-octet entity in BGP. This document describes extensions to BGP to carry the Autonomous System number as a four-octet entity. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4892 - Requirements for a Mechanism Identifying a Name Server Instance
With the increased use of DNS anycast, load balancing, and other mechanisms allowing more than one DNS name server to share a single IP address, it is sometimes difficult to tell which of a pool of name servers has answered a particular query. A standardized mechanism to determine the identity of a name server responding to a particular query would be useful, particularly as a diagnostic aid for administrators. Existing ad hoc mechanisms for addressing this need have some shortcomings, not the least of which is the lack of prior analysis of exactly how such a mechanism should be designed and deployed. This document describes the existing convention used in some widely deployed implementations of the DNS protocol, including advantages and disadvantages, and discusses some attributes of an improved mechanism. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4891 - Using IPsec to Secure IPv6-in-IPv4 Tunnels
This document gives guidance on securing manually configured IPv6-in- IPv4 tunnels using IPsec in transport mode. No additional protocol extensions are described beyond those available with the IPsec framework. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4890 - Recommendations for Filtering ICMPv6 Messages in Firewalls
In networks supporting IPv6, the Internet Control Message Protocol version 6 (ICMPv6) plays a fundamental role with a large number of functions, and a correspondingly large number of message types and options. ICMPv6 is essential to the functioning of IPv6, but there are a number of security risks associated with uncontrolled forwarding of ICMPv6 messages. Filtering strategies designed for the corresponding protocol, ICMP, in IPv4 networks are not directly applicable, because these strategies are intended to accommodate a useful auxiliary protocol that may not be required for correct functioning.
RFC4889 - Network Mobility Route Optimization Solution Space Analysis
With current Network Mobility (NEMO) Basic Support, all communications to and from Mobile Network Nodes must go through the Mobile Router and Home Agent (MRHA) tunnel when the mobile network is away. This results in increased length of packet route and increased packet delay in most cases. To overcome these limitations, one might have to turn to Route Optimization (RO) for NEMO. This memo documents various types of Route Optimization in NEMO and explores the benefits and tradeoffs in different aspects of NEMO Route Optimization. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4888 - Network Mobility Route Optimization Problem Statement
With current Network Mobility (NEMO) Basic Support, all communications to and from Mobile Network Nodes must go through the bi-directional tunnel established between the Mobile Router and Home Agent when the mobile network is away. This sub-optimal routing results in various inefficiencies associated with packet delivery, such as increased delay and bottleneck links leading to traffic congestion, which can ultimately disrupt all communications to and from the Mobile Network Nodes. Additionally, with nesting of Mobile Networks, these inefficiencies get compounded, and stalemate conditions may occur in specific dispositions. This document investigates such problems and provides the motivation behind Route Optimization (RO) for NEMO. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4887 - Network Mobility Home Network Models
This paper documents some of the usage patterns and the associated issues when deploying a Home Network for Network Mobility (NEMO)- enabled Mobile Routers, conforming to the NEMO Basic Support. The aim here is specifically to provide some examples of organization of the Home Network, as they were discussed in NEMO-related mailing lists. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4886 - Network Mobility Support Goals and Requirements
Network mobility arises when a router connecting a network to the Internet dynamically changes its point of attachment to the Internet thereby causing the reachability of the said network to be changed in relation to the fixed Internet topology. Such a type of network is referred to as a mobile network. With appropriate mechanisms, sessions established between nodes in the mobile network and the global Internet can be maintained after the mobile router changes its point of attachment. This document outlines the goals expected from network mobility support and defines the requirements that must be met by the NEMO Basic Support solution. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4885 - Network Mobility Support Terminology
This document defines a terminology for discussing network mobility (NEMO) issues and solution requirements. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4884 - Extended ICMP to Support Multi-Part Messages
This document redefines selected ICMP messages to support multi-part operation. A multi-part ICMP message carries all of the information that ICMP messages carried previously, as well as additional information that applications may require.
RFC4883 - Benchmarking Terminology for Resource Reservation Capable Routers
The primary purpose of this document is to define terminology specific to the benchmarking of resource reservation signaling of Integrated Services (IntServ) IP routers. These terms can be used in additional documents that define benchmarking methodologies for routers that support resource reservation or reporting formats for the benchmarking measurements. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4882 - IP Address Location Privacy and Mobile IPv6: Problem Statement
In this document, we discuss location privacy as applicable to Mobile IPv6. We document the concerns arising from revealing a Home Address to an onlooker and from disclosing a Care-of Address to a correspondent. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4881 - Low-Latency Handoffs in Mobile IPv4
Mobile IPv4 describes how a Mobile Node can perform IPv4-layer handoffs between subnets served by different Foreign Agents. In certain cases, the latency involved in these handoffs can be above the threshold required for the support of delay-sensitive or real-time services. The aim of this document is to present two methods to achieve low-latency Mobile IPv4 handoffs. In addition, a combination of these two methods is described. The described techniques allow greater support for real-time services on a Mobile IPv4 network by minimizing the period of time when a Mobile Node is unable to send or receive IPv4 packets due to the delay in the Mobile IPv4 Registration process. This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community.
RFC4880 - OpenPGP Message Format
This document is maintained in order to publish all necessary information needed to develop interoperable applications based on the OpenPGP format. It is not a step-by-step cookbook for writing an application. It describes only the format and methods needed to read, check, generate, and write conforming packets crossing any network. It does not deal with storage and implementation questions. It does, however, discuss implementation issues necessary to avoid security flaws.
RFC4879 - Clarification of the Third Party Disclosure Procedure in RFC 3979
This document clarifies and updates a single sentence in RFC 3979. Specifically, when third party Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) disclosures are made, the intention is that the IETF Executive Director notify the IPR holder that a third party disclosure has been filed, and to ask the IPR holder whether they have any disclosure that needs to be made, per applicable RFC 3979 rules. This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
RFC4878 - Definitions and Managed Objects for Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) Functions on Ethernet-Like Interfaces
This document defines objects for managing Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) capabilities on Ethernet-like interfaces conformant to the Ethernet OAM functionality defined in the Ethernet in the First Mile (EFM) clauses of the Ethernet standards. The Ethernet OAM functionality is complementary to the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) in that it is focused on a small set of link-specific functions for directly connected Ethernet interfaces. This document defines objects for controlling those link OAM functions and for providing results and status of the OAM functions to management entities. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4877 - Mobile IPv6 Operation with IKEv2 and the Revised IPsec Architecture
This document describes Mobile IPv6 operation with the revised IPsec architecture and IKEv2. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4876 - A Configuration Profile Schema for Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP)-Based Agents
This document consists of two primary components, a schema for agents that make use of the Lightweight Directory Access protocol (LDAP) and a proposed use case of that schema, for distributed configuration of similar directory user agents. A set of attribute types and an object class are proposed. In the proposed use case, directory user agents (DUAs) can use this schema to determine directory data location and access parameters for specific services they support. In addition, in the proposed use case, attribute and object class mapping allows DUAs to reconfigure their expected (default) schema to match that of the end user's environment. This document is intended to be a skeleton for future documents that describe configuration of specific DUA services. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4875 - Extensions to Resource Reservation Protocol - Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) for Point-to-Multipoint TE Label Switched Paths (LSPs)
This document describes extensions to Resource Reservation Protocol - Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) for the set up of Traffic Engineered (TE) point-to-multipoint (P2MP) Label Switched Paths (LSPs) in Multi- Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Generalized MPLS (GMPLS) networks. The solution relies on RSVP-TE without requiring a multicast routing protocol in the Service Provider core. Protocol elements and procedures for this solution are described.
RFC4874 - Exclude Routes - Extension to Resource ReserVation Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE)
This document specifies ways to communicate route exclusions during path setup using Resource ReserVation Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE).
RFC4873 - GMPLS Segment Recovery
This document describes protocol specific procedures for GMPLS (Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching) RSVP-TE (Resource ReserVation Protocol - Traffic Engineering) signaling extensions to support label switched path (LSP) segment protection and restoration. These extensions are intended to complement and be consistent with the RSVP-TE Extensions for End-to-End GMPLS Recovery (RFC 4872). Implications and interactions with fast reroute are also addressed. This document also updates the handling of NOTIFY_REQUEST objects. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4872 - RSVP-TE Extensions in Support of End-to-End Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Recovery
This document describes protocol-specific procedures and extensions for Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Resource ReSerVation Protocol - Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) signaling to support end-to-end Label Switched Path (LSP) recovery that denotes protection and restoration. A generic functional description of GMPLS recovery can be found in a companion document, RFC 4426. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4871 - DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) Signatures
DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) defines a domain-level authentication framework for email using public-key cryptography and key server technology to permit verification of the source and contents of messages by either Mail Transfer Agents (MTAs) or Mail User Agents (MUAs). The ultimate goal of this framework is to permit a signing domain to assert responsibility for a message, thus protecting message signer identity and the integrity of the messages they convey while retaining the functionality of Internet email as it is known today. Protection of email identity may assist in the global control of "spam" and "phishing". [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4870 - Domain-Based Email Authentication Using Public Keys Advertised in the DNS (DomainKeys)
"DomainKeys" creates a domain-level authentication framework for email by using public key technology and the DNS to prove the provenance and contents of an email.
RFC4869 - Suite B Cryptographic Suites for IPsec
This document proposes four optional cryptographic user interface suites ("UI suites") for IPsec, similar to the two suites specified in RFC 4308. The four new suites provide compatibility with the United States National Security Agency's Suite B specifications. This memo provides information for the Internet community.
RFC4868 - Using HMAC-SHA-256, HMAC-SHA-384, and HMAC-SHA-512 with IPsec
This specification describes the use of Hashed Message Authentication Mode (HMAC) in conjunction with the SHA-256, SHA-384, and SHA-512 algorithms in IPsec. These algorithms may be used as the basis for data origin authentication and integrity verification mechanisms for the Authentication Header (AH), Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP), Internet Key Exchange Protocol (IKE), and IKEv2 protocols, and also as Pseudo-Random Functions (PRFs) for IKE and IKEv2. Truncated output lengths are specified for the authentication-related variants, with the corresponding algorithms designated as HMAC-SHA-256-128, HMAC-SHA-384-192, and HMAC-SHA-512-256. The PRF variants are not truncated, and are called PRF-HMAC-SHA-256, PRF-HMAC-SHA-384, and PRF-HMAC-SHA-512. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4867 - RTP Payload Format and File Storage Format for the Adaptive Multi-Rate (AMR) and Adaptive Multi-Rate Wideband (AMR-WB) Audio Codecs
This document specifies a Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) payload format to be used for Adaptive Multi-Rate (AMR) and Adaptive Multi-Rate Wideband (AMR-WB) encoded speech signals. The payload format is designed to be able to interoperate with existing AMR and AMR-WB transport formats on non-IP networks. In addition, a file format is specified for transport of AMR and AMR-WB speech data in storage mode applications such as email. Two separate media type registrations are included, one for AMR and one for AMR-WB, specifying use of both the RTP payload format and the storage format. This document obsoletes RFC 3267. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4866 - Enhanced Route Optimization for Mobile IPv6
This document specifies an enhanced version of Mobile IPv6 route optimization, providing lower handoff delays, increased security, and reduced signaling overhead. [STANDARDS-TRACK]
RFC4865 - SMTP Submission Service Extension for Future Message Release
This memo defines an extension to the SMTP submission protocol for a client to indicate a future time for the message to be released for delivery. This extension permits a client to use server-based storage for a message that should be held in queue until an appointed time in the future. This is useful for clients which do not have local storage or are otherwise unable to release a message for delivery at an appointed time. [STANDARDS-TRACK]